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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences. (search)
rbities engendered by it are fast being buried in the grave of Oblivion — where is the gray-headed Confederate whose eve does not kindle at the remembrance of those four heroic years? Does he not feel like re-echoing the glowing words which the great dramatist puts in the mouth of Henry the Fifth the night before Agincourt, This story shall the goodman teach his son.— The that shall live this day, and see old age, Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbors, And say, To-morrow is Saint Crispin; Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars, And say, These wounds I had on Crispin's day. And does not his heart burn while he tells with pride of the days when with unfaltering steps, though weary and hungry, but with the light of battle in his eye, he followed in the lead of those illustrious captains and masters of war, A. P. Hill, Jackson, Hampton, Stuart, Mosby, Johnston, Kirby Smith and a host of other gallant spirits—and last, though not least, of Robert Edward
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Dranesville, Va. (search)
as not in pursuit of Stuart's wagon train, and Stuart had no designs against Ord's line of retreat. s it commands all of the surrounding country. Stuart knew this position well, and immediately starts march through the woods around Ord's flank. Stuart afterward stated that, had he gained this poinwhile many more were dangerously wounded. General Stuart, in his report of the battle, wrote: Everyods and dense undergrowth. Stuarts work. Stuart placed two of his regiments on either side of r. When moving forward to attack the enemy, Stuart sent a few of his cavalrymen scurrying about td battery. About this time a report reached Stuart that a large force was moving on the Washingtoanesville at the sound of the first firing. Stuart, being outnumbered and hard pressed, and knowi enemy made no serious attempt at pursuit, and Stuart went into camp for the night at old Fryingpan d, 61 wounded, and none missing; total, 68. Stuart reported 43 killed, 143 wounded, 8 missing; to[8 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
replied: Sir, we will not be beaten back. We will give them the bayonet. Bee rushed to his own decimated ranks and rallied them by exclaiming: Look! there stands Jackson like a stone wall! Rally on the Virginians! Let us determine to die here, and we will conquer! Jackson not only stood the shock of the heavy attack made on him, but did give them the bayonet, checked the onward tide of McDowell's victory, and held his position until Kirby Smith and Early came up on the flank. Jeb Stuart made a successful cavalry charge, Johnston and Beauregard had time to hurry up other troops, and a great Confederate victory was snatched from impending disaster. The name which the gallant Bee, about to yield up his noble life, gave Jackson that day, clung to him ever afterwards, and he will be known in history not by the name Thomas Jonathan Jackson, which his parents gave him, but as Stonewall Jackson. And yet the name was a misnomer. Thunderbolt, Tornado or Cyclone would be more app
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.54 (search)
W. H. L. Wallace's (C. F. Smith's) Divisions, the first of which was stretched across the Corinth Road and the other extended to the leftward in the direction of Stuart's Brigade, on Lick Creek. Five of Hurlbut's regiments had fought at Fort Donelson. This division, in the studious absence of official data, we may safely set ace (W. H. L.) had soon become involved in the battle. Manifestly a gallant soldier, he fought his division men, who had been at Donelson, with decided stamina. Stuart's Brigade, Sherman's Division, had also been attacked, and the Federal line of battle was pushed back to within a mile of the landing, and to the ground of their nts. There were massed what remained of their artillery and the fragments of Sherman's, Prentiss', McClernand's and Hurlbut's Divisions, as well as Wallace's and Stuart's. In the meantime, from the nature of the field—the network of ravines, the interlaced thickets and wide scope of forest—the Confederate organization had beco
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of New Market, Va., again, (search)
ked body of men was formed, the volunteers being ignorant of their destination and being only forwarned that they were composing a forlorn hope. As my memory serves me, these volunteers were taken from the following commands, at the rate of six or eight from each: Edgecombe Guards, Charlotte Grays, Hornet's Nest Riflemen, Orange Light Infantry, Lafayette Light Infantry, Burke Rifles, Independent Light Infantry,. Enfield Rifles, Southern Stars, Bertie Light Infantry, Chowan Light Infantry, Stuart's and Montague's Virginia Light Infantry, twelve dismounted men of Douthat's Virginia Cavalry. After this lapse of time my recollection is indistinct, and I can recall by name of these volunteers only J. B. Smith, R. M. Orrell, James T. Rose, Theodore Wardell and J. W. Hurlst, of my own company, the Lafayette; Charles Haigh, W. E. Kyle, Jarvis Lutterloh and John B. McKellar, of the Independent Company. All were killed during the war or have died since except Haigh, Kyle and the writer.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.70 (search)
t five Forks fight. From the Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, July 1, 1906. Graphic story of daring deeds performed on hopeless field of Battle—had Pickett been there—The sad story of five Forks told for the first time. Colonel J. Risque Hutter, of the 11th Virginia Infantry, was one of three brothers who participated in the war. Major Edward S. Hutter, a distinguished graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, and a civil engineer of great talents, served for a time on General J. E. B. Stuart's staff, and then in the Ordnance Department of the Army. Captain Ferdinand Hutter was an officer of the Quartermaster's Department, and Colonel J. Risque Hutter, the younger of the three, went from Lynchburg as captain of the Jeff Davis Guards. He served from Bull Run to Five Forks; was wounded and captured in Pickett's charge at Gettysburg; was a well-trained officer, a fine tactician, and rendered valuable, gallant and efficient service. Colonel Hutter lives in Campbell Coun
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Right of, 166 Sharpsburg Battle of 142, 196; mortality of 22nd Virginia at, 348 Shenandoah, C. S. Steamer, 235; officers of, 242; vessels captured by, 245; the flag of, 258. Sherman's, Gen. W. T. War is hell 365 Shiloh, The Battle of 204; relative Confederate and Federal losses in, 225; commentaries on causes of defeat 226 Shipp, Gen., Scott, 231 Sims Frederick Wilmer, 166 Smythe Gerald, of England, his Admiration of the Southern Cause, 125 Stewart. Col. Wm. H., 235 Stuart, Gen. J. E B., killed, 143 Sturdivant's Battery, Major N A , 10 Talcott, Col. T. M R., 25 Tucker. Col. Joseph T., 277 Valentine, Sculptor, E. V., 97 Virginia Cavalry: Roll of Co. A 7th Regiment, 335 Roll of Co E 18th Regiment, 161 Roll of McNeil's Rangers 323 Virginia Infantry: Roll of Co. E 19th Regiment 312 Roll of Co. G, 24th Regiment 352 Roll of Co. 115th Regiment 363 Roll of Co. A, 49th Regiment, 298 Vicksburg, Siege of, 47; Confederate States dead in Cemetery at, 53