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Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 18 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 18 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 14 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Joseph Sturge or search for Joseph Sturge in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 3 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
Ms. And, in a letter to Mr. Garrison himself, Richard D. Webb, Ms. on May 30, reported that Joseph Sturge, the weightiest member of the London Committee, regarded the mere defence of Garrison and Cof N. C. to affect my N Colver. religious character by his absurd and monstrous statement to Joseph Sturge, that I have headed an infidel convention. Even supposing the charge were true, I should lithose of Barclay, Penn, and Fox; that, respecting the Sabbath, the church, and the ministry, Joseph Sturge and I (if he be a genuine Friend) harmonize in opinion; that I believe in an indwelling Chrio all the distinctive views of Friends, and he regards them all as infidel; yet he writes to Joseph Sturge as though he fully agreed with him as to the nature of the Sabbath, and as though I held purely infidel views on this subject!! Why does not Joseph Sturge, as an honest man and a sincere friend to the anti-slavery cause (I will not refer to his former professions of personal friendship for
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
fter Ante, 2.325. 1850! He was refused permission to offer his amendment then, and has never proposed it since, such as it is, though he has had four years to do it in! And yet Leavitt claims him as one of his men, and Whittier, in a letter to Sturge, in one of the last Joseph Sturge. B. & F. Reporters, describes him, in effect, as the leader of the A. S. movement, and gives the British public to understand that he is the head of the Liberty Party! The real head (or figure-head) of that pJoseph Sturge. B. & F. Reporters, describes him, in effect, as the leader of the A. S. movement, and gives the British public to understand that he is the head of the Liberty Party! The real head (or figure-head) of that party, J. G. Birney, having exposed Adams's erratic course on the subject of slavery, Leavitt expressly dissented from his chief (Lib. 14: 45). They were at one in opposition to disunion on any pretext (Lib. 17: 14). In a letter from Boston to the Standard, reviewing the annual meeting, Mr. Child wrote that, as to disunion, he was convinced his repugnance to discussing the subject had been wrong. It was a duty to discuss it. I can see plainly, he said, that the doctrine of Repeal, as it is
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
—which fact will give you as much comfort as any that I could possibly send you. The next excursion was to Birmingham, with Thompson Sept. 4, 1846. and Douglass, where, besides a good public meeting, there was a memorable breakfast with Joseph Sturge, on his invitation. In the presence of a considerable number of his relatives, wrote Mr. Garrison to his wife, for Ms. Sept. 10, 1846; cf. Ms. Sept. 5, W. L. G. to R. D. Webb, P. S. by G. Thompson. more than an hour, I had a very plain andcountry, and I presume [it] will be the last; for the opposition to us, in this country, runs almost exclusively in the channels of Quakerism, in consequence of the poisonous influence exerted by the Broad-Street Committee in London, of which Joseph Sturge is a member. Ms. Sept. 10, 1846, W. L. G. to H. E. G. The poet Montgomery was present, and was deeply Ms. Sept. 9, 1846, James Montgomery to M. and R. Brady. affected by the proceedings. Another auditor was the ex-Methodist Rev. Joseph Bar