hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 49 3 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 34 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 33 9 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 33 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 21 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 17 3 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 13 5 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Sturgis or search for Sturgis in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

y a brilliant charge, in which the 11th Ohio and the 11th Connecticut participated very conspicuously, and lost many men. If the greater obstacles constitute the post of honor on a field of battle, General Burnside may justly claim to have had that post in Wednesday's battle. Once across the river, he found the enemy in force, and in a new position of great strength on a hill. Against this position he advanced at once, and the old valor of the divisions of Generals Cox. Willcox, and Sturgis, was once more triumphant and the hill was taken. No sooner was its summit reached than a heavy battery of artillery at once opened upon his reins with a fire that must soon have annihilated them if permitted to continue. It was at once clear that the hill was untirable unless the battery was taken. At the same time the enemy in front began to receive heavy reinforcements, and General Burnside's position became critical. To go forward with that heavy battery mowing his flank and with an