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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 8 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Russell Sturgis or search for Russell Sturgis in all documents.

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ers were closely connected by intermarriage; and a personal difficulty with one was quickly taken up by the related families,—so that through connections by kin or friendship nearly all the society was likely to take a part. For instance, the Ticknor, Eliot, Dwight, Guild, and Norton families were connected by marriage; and Mr. Eliot was a near kinsman of the Curtis family. Similar ties by blood and marriage united the Sears, Mason, Warren, Parker, and Amory families, and also the Shaw, Sturgis, Parkman, and Perkins families. Another group was the Sturgis, Perkins, Cabot, Forbes, Cary, Gardiner, and Cushing families. The different groups were often connected by kin or close friendship. Sumner was for a time, at an earlier period, shut out from one house on Beacon Street merely for complimenting, in a lawyer's office, the editor of a magazine who had reviewed a domestic controversy already before the public in judicial proceedings. The head of the family, learning the circumstan
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
ted. He deceived half the North, but they are undeceived. He does not stand as he did six months ago. Adams's Biography of Dana. p. 286. The Compromise was promptly approved in a public letter to him, signed by several hundreds of the most conspicuous citizens, Boston Courier, April 3, 1850; Boston Advertiser, April 3. The last—named newspaper, by a slip of the pen, called the signers Mr. Webster's retainers.—among them merchants like Eliot, Perkins, Fearing, Appleton, Haven, Amory, Sturgis, Thayer, and Hooper; lawyers like Choate, Lunt, B. R. Curtis, and G. T. Curtis; physicians like Jackson and Bigelow; scholars like Ticknor, Everett, Prescott, Sparks, Holmes, and Felton; divines like Moses Stuart and Leonard Woods. Its passage was signalized by the firing of one hundred guns on the Common. Webster's partisans, such was their intensity of feeling, very soon obtained the mastery of the Whig organization of the city, and compelled dissenters to submit to the nominations th
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
I wonder they do not all desert, and come to us. Sumner was in England again September 19. He remained less than a week in London, visiting for a night Mr. Russell Sturgis at Walton, and Lord Cranworth at Holwood. He dined twice with Mr. Parkes at the Reform Club, but his friends were mostly absent from London. He then went ng went to Albert Smith's Mont Blanc. June 20. Passed some time with Lord Brougham,—very kind, but old; drove with the Mackintoshes in Hyde Park; dined at Russell Sturgis's. June 21. Church in the Abbey; found myself seated at the foot of the tomb of Fowell Buxton; dined with Mackintosh. Afterwards to Metropolitan Club, wh, also the house where William was killed), Antwerp, Brussels, and Ghent. September 19. Reached London [from Ostend] about noon; in the evening went to Mr. Russell Sturgis's at Walton. September 20. Returned to London, and went to Lord Cranworth's in Kent; his place is Holwood, once the residence of William Pitt; walked in