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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of Beverly ford. (search)
in war, operations from a common centre outward are better advised than by the contrary method. Concentration of troops is often so difficult of attainment when the links of connection are once lost. A conspicuous example of this truth has been lately brought to mind by Dr. Lambdin's admirable narrative read at the Centennial celebration of the battle of Germantown, and even now one can but feel sorry for General Washington as a soldier-thinking of him in the fog before Chew's house, with Sullivan and Wayne groping in front, and no tidings as yet of Greene on the Limekiln road, and Armstrong at the mouth of the Wissahickon. If he had spread his battle-fan outward from his centre on the turnpike, unfolding it as he advanced, perhaps no one would have inquired a century after why the good people of Germantown wished to commemorate a defeat. Be that as it may, General Pleasonton was destined to reap some of the occasional disadvantages of a broken military chain. The force dispatched
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Torpedo service in Charleston harbor. (search)
the Confederate States Navy, took charge of it, and about eight o'clock one hazy night, on the ebb tide, with a crew of one engineer, J. I. Tomb; one fireman, James Sullivan; and a pilot, J. W. Cannon, he fearlessly set forth from Charleston on his perilous mission — the destruction of the New Ironsides. I may note that this iroercession of his friend, Captain W. D. Whiting, commanding the Ottawa, he was released on giving his parole not to attempt to escape from the ship. The fireman, Sullivan, had taken refuge on the rudder of the New Ironsides, where he was discovered, put in irons and kept in a dark cell until sent with Glassel to New York, to be trtended specially to study and develop that important branch of the military service. After a captivity of many months in Forts Lafayette and Warren, Glassel and Sullivan were finally exchanged for the captain and a sailor of the Federal steamer Isaac Smith, a heavily-armed gunboat which was captured in the Stono river, with its e
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson's Valley campaign. (search)
that it expected to leave for Harper's Ferry the next day. This information, transmitted to Jackson, caused the latter to push on with all haste the next morning. At daylight he sent three companies of infantry to reinforce Ashby, and followed with his whole force. He reached Kernstown at two P. M., after a march of fourteen miles. General Shields had made his dispositions to meet attack, by advancing Kimball's Brigade of four regiments and Daum's Artillery to the vicinity of Kernstown. Sullivan's Brigade of four regiments was posted in rear of Kimball, and Tyler's Brigade of five regiments, with Broadhead's cavalry, was held in reserve. Ashby kept up an active skirmish with the advance of Shields' force during the forenoon. But, though thus making ready, the Federal generals did not expect an attack in earnest. Shields says he had the country, in front and flank, carefully reconnoitred during the forenoon on the 23d of March, and the officers in charge reported no indication
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Torpedo service in the Harbor and water defences of Charleston. (search)
the Confederate States Navy, took charge of it, and about eight o'clock one hazy night, on the ebb tide, with a crew of one engineer, J. H. Tomb; one fireman, James Sullivan; and a pilot, J. W. Cannon; he fearlessly set forth from Charleston on his perilous mission — the destruction of the New Ironsides. I may note that this ironercession of his friend, Captain W. D. Whiting, commanding the Ottawa, he was released on giving his parole not to attempt to escape from the ship. The fireman, Sullivan, had taken refuge on the rudder of the New Ironsides, where he was discovered, put in irons and kept in a dark cell until sent with Glassel to New York, to be ttended specially to study and develop that important branch of the military service. After a captivity of many months in Forts Lafayette and Warren, Glassel and Sullivan were finally exchanged for the captain and a sailor of the Federal steamer Isaac Smith, a heavily-armed gunboat which was captured in the Stono river, with its e
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
ander Crawford, John Laverty, Benjamin Loyd, David Warren, William Wright, John Sullivan, Robert T. Clifford, Thomas Harding, Perry Wilkes, John Hyland, Michael McCormick, Timothy O'Donohue, George Butts, Charles Asten, John Ortega. Maurice Wagg, R. H. King,----Wilkes,----Demming, Bernard Harley, William Smith, Richard Hamilton, Edward J. Houghton, Oliver O'Brien, Frank Lucas, William Garvin, Charles J. Bibber, John Neil, Robert Montgomery, James Roberts, Charles Hawking, Dennis Conlan, James Sullivan, William Hinnegan, Charles Rice, John Cooper, Patrick Mullin, James Saunders, James Horton, James Rountry, John H. Ferrell, John Ditzenbach, Thomas Taylor, Patrick Mullin, Aaron Anderson or Sanderson (colored), Charles H. Smith, Hugh Logan, Lewis A. Horton, George Moore, Luke M. Griswold, John Jones, George Pyne, Thomas Smith, Charles Reed, John S. Lann, George Schutt, John Mack, John H. Nibbe, Othniel Tripp, John Griffiths, Edward Swatton, John Swatson, Phillip Bazaar, George Province,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
us an expedition than for the expected attack on Fort Fisher. The officers and men who volunteered to go with Commander Rhind--himself a volunteer — were Lieutenant Samuel W. Preston of the Admiral's staff, Second-Assistant Engineer A. T. E. Mullan, Master's Mate Paul Boyden; Frank Lucas, Coxswain; William Gainn, Captain-of-the-Forecastle; Charles T. Bibber, Gunner's Mate; John Neil, Quarter-Gunner; Robert Montgomery, Captain-of-the-Afterguard; James Roberts and Dennis Conlan, Seamen; James Sullivan, Ordinary Seaman; William Horrigan, Second-class Fireman; Charles Rice, Coal-heaver. The men were all volunteers from Commander Rhind's vessel, the Agawam. General Butler had been again notified that the powder-boat would be exploded on the night of the 23d December, as near the beach at Fort Fisher as it was possible to get her, but the exact distance could not be estimated in the darkness. Although the Louisiana had low steam up, she was towed to within a short distance of her sta
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
ah Bruen--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Wm. F. Redding; Acting-Ensigns, S. P. Edwards and J. Richardson; Acting-Master's Mate, Wm. H. Olmey. Iris--Fourth-rate. Acting-Ensign, Wm. H. Anderson; Acting-Master's Mates, W. W. Brandt, Elisha Hubbard and Roger Conoly; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Richard Nash; Acting-Third-Assistants, Dennis Lyng and James Hankey. Dandelion--Fourth-rate. Acting Ensign, George W. Williams; Acting-Master's Mates, W. F. Vincent, J. K. Gould and James Sullivan; Engineers: Acting-Third-Assistants, E. Babbit and John McKeezer. Arethusa--Fourth-rate. Acting-Ensign, John V. Cook; Acting Master's Mates, I. D. Lovett and F. H. Newcomb; Engineers: Acting-Second Assistant, Geo. W. Howe : Acting-Third-Assistant, William J. Moore and J. T. Greenwood. Camelia--Fourth-rate. Acting-Ensign, David B. Howes; Acting-Master's Mates, Abraham Leach, F H. Munroe and Wm. F. Lard; Engineers: Acting-Third-Assistants, Benjamin Cobb, Jr., John Grimes and Jo
e honor to command. For the efficient services of himself and his command I am greatly indebted to First Lieut. John S. Rider, Co. K, Thirty-second regiment Illinois Volunteers. I regret to have to report the following casualties, namely: James Sullivan, seaman, killed; Patrick Sullivan, seaman, missing; Thomas M. Borland, seaman, missing; John Hines, corporal Co. K, Thirty-second regiment Illinois Volunteers, missing. James Sullivan was seen to fall upon the field, shot through the breast.James Sullivan was seen to fall upon the field, shot through the breast. During the action there were expended forty-five, eight-inch shell, twenty-five six-inch shell, and sixteen stand of grape. Two rifles and one musket are missing. They are those taken by the unfortunate men whom we have lost. I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient servant, James W. Shirk, Lieutenant Commanding. To Flag-Officer A. H. Foote, Commanding U. S. Naval Forces, Cairo, Ill. Chicago post narrative. Cairo, Monday, March 3. The discovery of a new rebel batte
er it was possible, fired from cover; and as often as a head appeared from behind a tree or bush, it became a mark for our men. The Union troops generally stood in ranks, and except when skirmishing, made no use of objects of protection. Adjutant Sullivan, of the Third Illinois cavalry, passed through the entire action unhurt. His horse was shot under him, but will probably recover from the wound. Adjutant Sullivan is the Sergeant Sullivan who received, in the charge at Dug Spring, in AuguAdjutant Sullivan is the Sergeant Sullivan who received, in the charge at Dug Spring, in August last, five severe wounds, two of which were supposed to be mortal. The horse which was wounded yesterday is the same that he rode at Dug Spring, and now carries fourteen balls received on that occasion. Where all the troops did well, it is difficult to particularize instances of special regimental valor. The Iowa infantry came from the field covered with blood and glory, and the two batteries from the same State are equally deserving of praise. The Twelfth Missouri was successful in a
posted in a strong position to support his brigade, if attacked. Sullivan's brigade was posted in the rear of Kimball's, and within supportis in that quarter. On receiving this information I pushed forward Sullivan's brigade, which was placed, by order of Col. Kimball, in a positiirably supported by four pieces of artillery under Capt. Jenks and Sullivan's gallant brigade. This united force repulsed the enemy at all pot by the Fifth Ohio, Thirteenth Indiana, and Sixty-second Ohio, of Sullivan's brigade, and the Fourteenth Indiana, Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania,serve, consummated this glorious action. High praise is due to Col. Sullivan, commanding Second brigade, for the manner in which he contribu flank movement of the enemy. The Second brigade, commanded by Col. Sullivan, composed of the Thirteenth Indiana, Fifth Ohio, Sixty-second O Buckley, Cheek, and Creighton, deserve well of their country. Col. Sullivan, Candy's brigade, on the left, was not attacked in force. His
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