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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 3: through Harper's Ferry to Winchester—The Valley of the Shenandoah. (search)
out on the Strasburg road nearly to Kernstown. In rear, Sullivan supported Kimball, and covered the approaches to Winchestenth Indiana; Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania. Second brigade, Sullivan's, -Thirteenth Indiana; Fifth Ohio; Sixty-second Ohio; Thcements of the Fifth and Sixth Ohio and the Thirteenth of Sullivan's brigade, the Fourteenth Indiana, Eighty-fourth Pennsylvad concealed behind Round Hill, in front of which was Colonel Sullivan, of Shields's brigade, and, for some purpose of offence, beyond Colonel Sullivan was Jackson. Now Jackson was constantly stirring up Sullivan, and Sullivan was as constantly stSullivan, and Sullivan was as constantly stirring up my brigade at Round Hill. The enemy seemed to be always advancing. .Bits of paper announcing it in hurried thoughSullivan was as constantly stirring up my brigade at Round Hill. The enemy seemed to be always advancing. .Bits of paper announcing it in hurried though laconic style floated through camp, until How is Sullivan? became a popular inquiry. The enemy was constantly in readinesSullivan? became a popular inquiry. The enemy was constantly in readiness to move, said our spies, but in which direction was the conundrum of the hour. When we pursued towards Strasburg, Ashby m
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 4: the Valley of the Shenandoah (continued)—Return to Strasburg. (search)
e, diverges into two branches, one of which crosses the South Fork of the Shenandoah at Columbia Bridge, the other at Massanutten town, and thence to Luray. Colonel Sullivan of Shields's division, who had been left to guard Columbia Bridge, informed Banks, about the first of May, that a deserter reported that on the thirtieth of composed of twelve or fifteen regiments commanded by Jackson, Taliaferro, Winder, and Ewell, and added that Jackson expected additional reinforcements. That Colonel Sullivan was in the same state of excitement as when at Strasburg was apparent from a despatch received from him, dated at Columbia Bridge at 2.25 P. M., addressed bor new rumors came that Jackson was about attempting to seize the gap-road across the mountains, which connects the two valleys at New Market, the road where Colonel Sullivan's pickets were attacked on the Gordonsville pike. While our columns were hurrying along the road, my eyes fell upon my Peggy, keeping Ilp with the artillery
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Index (search)
ntain, 305. Stone, Charles P., commands Federal forces in Civil War, 64. Directs military operations leading to the battle of Ball's Bluff, 65 et seq. His official report quoted from, 71, 72, 77, 79, 80. Is arrested, and confined in Fort Lafayette, 99. Strasburg, Va., occupied and fortified by Banks's corps, 173,174. Banks's retreat from, to Winchester (Va.), 201-224. Strother, Mr., his Recollections of a Campaign in Virginia, 202 (note), 294 (note), 330, 331 (note), 348-350. Sullivan, Colonel, Federal officer, 133, 164, 165. Surgeon, a Rebel, how he was captured and interviewed by General Gordon, 216, 217. What he said to Banks, 225. T Taliaferro, Genera], Rebel officer in Stonewall Jackson's army, 177, 240, 289, 292, 295, 318. Taylor, Colonel, Rebel officer under Stonewall Jackson, 209, 237, 240. Telegraph, an exasperating yet amusing talk by, 41-44. Tenth Maine Regiment, the, its heroic conduct and terrible loss in the battle of Cedar Mountain, 298-