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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 20 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Sully or search for Sully in all documents.

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advanced for a campaign against the Indians, General Pope sent a column, under Brigadier-General Sibley, up the Mississippi River to near our northern boundary, and thence across the country to the Missouri, and another of cavalry, under Brigadier-General Sully, from Sioux City, up the latter river, to cut off the retreat of the hostile Indians whom General Sibley might drive before him from Minnesota and Eastern Dacotah. Unfortunately, these movements were not well timed, and no junction was ed crossed to the west side of the Mississippi, and General Sibley reached that river about forty miles below Fort Clark, on the twenty-ninth July, having marched the distance, some six hundred miles, from St. Paul. On the third September, General Sully encountered and defeated, at Whitestone Hall, about one hundred and thirty miles above the Little Cheyenne, a body of Indians, a part of which had previously been engaged against Sibley's column. The savages were defeated with a heavy loss i