hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 26 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 26 results in 5 document sections:

John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 3: community life (search)
is fellows, and seldom joined in the merriment, but was always on hand for the serious affairs, having been made a trustee soon after his arrival. He not only worked and taught well, but sang well, and was bass in a choir which, according to Arthur Sumner, sang a Kyrie Eleison night and day. It seems to me, adds Sumner, that they sang it rather often. One admirable bit of training for his future profession Dana acquired through his connection with the Harbinger, to which he was a frequent conSumner, that they sang it rather often. One admirable bit of training for his future profession Dana acquired through his connection with the Harbinger, to which he was a frequent contributor. Many of his articles were youthful and imitative-hardly better than any well-brought — up young fellow might produce. The mannerisms of the sturdy English reviewing of the day sat heavily upon him, and he was constantly dismissing the victims of his disapproval with the familiar conge of the British quarterlies. Short poems and literary notices formed the major part of his work, but it is unnecessary to particularize the amount or quality of what he did. It was all excellent practic
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 6: return to New York journalism (search)
s, politicians, and statesmen. Missouri Compromises, Wilmot Provisos, the Omnibus Resolutions, Squatter Sovereignty, the Nebraska Bill, the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, the prohibition of slavery in the territories, the dissolution of the Union, the preservation of the Union, were subjects of absorbing interest more or less constantly under discussion. The great public men of the period were Clay, Webster, and Calhoun; while Benton, Dayton, Davis, Douglas, Crittenden, Sumner, Foote, Seward, and Mangum were lesser lights; but each was striving in his own way to compose the differences between the sections by compromises and arrangements, which it was hoped would not only save the Union, but would also save slavery where it legally existed, and put an end forever to the discussion of the slavery question. Each did his part according to his lights, but still the agitation went on with ever-increasing intensity, because the more it was discussed, the more evident i
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 9: Dana's influence in the tribune (search)
the year. The friends of freedom, under the advice of the Tribune, were now sending Sharp's rifles, as well as men to use them, into Kansas. The assault on Senator Sumner at his seat in the Senate by Preston S. Brooks, a member of the House of Representatives from South Carolina, was denounced as the culmination of Southern intolerance, and an outrage upon free speech and free thought. Sumner was far from being a popular man, but this act seemed to fill the entire North with a sense of danger that it had not hitherto felt. Its immediate effect was to intensify as well as to diversify the struggle. Fremont, The Pathfinder, an amiable but weak man with when sufficiently united in public sentiment were sure to come into control of Congress and the general government. It needed but a few acts like the assault on Sumner to so influence and unite the North as to place a political victory within its grasp. That Dana fully expected the election of Fremont, and counted upon it to pr
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 25: epoch of public corruption (search)
ch of public corruption Dana favors Continental Union breach between Sumner and President Condemns bestowal of office for pecuniary favors Grant's relatisition to the Santo Domingo Treaty was to make an impassable breach between Senator Sumner, chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations, and the President. Thereafter it was only necessary for Sumner and his friends to support a measure to make it certain that Grant and his friends would oppose it. Sumner resisted the annexatiSumner resisted the annexation of Santo Domingo, but favored the annexation of Canada and the neighboring provinces. From that time forth Grant did all in his power to override the opposition ah England, and had the pleasure not only of seeing the haughty and recalcitrant Sumner deposed by his fellow-senators from the chairmanship of the Committee on Foreigcealing the magnitude and enormity of these crimes. It called attention to Senator Sumner's resolution of inquiry into the sale of arms and ammunition by the War Dep
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
9, 210, 212, 215, 218, 223, 225, 226, 229, 233, 237, 240, 242-249, 255-258, 266, 267, 269, 271, 274, 276, 277, 285, 286, 289, 290, 294, 296, 298-302, 305, 306, 309, 311, 312, 316, 322, 328, 329, 332, 337, 338, 339, 346, 348, 350, 351, 352, 354, 362, 363, 366, 367, 369, 371,382, 383, 473, 474. Steedman, General, 266, 369. Stevenson, Colonel, 246; station, 278. Stevens's Gap, 256, 257. Stoneman, General, 303, 304, 341. Strike of carpenters, 101. Strike in Chicago, 480, 481. Sumner, Senator, 99, 148, 153, 422, 423, 425. Sumter, Fort, 164, 165, 177. Sun, New York, 379-382, 384, 386, 388, 392, 393-395, 397-399, 404, 405, 408, 409, 414-417, 419, 423-425, 427, 428, 430, 431, 433, 438, 439, 443-446, 453, 458, 459, 461, 465, 466, 468-471, 475-478, 484, 490, 495, 511, 514, 515. Sunflower Bayou, 207. Swedenborg, 27, 28, 56, 451. Swift, Lindsay, 47. Swinton, John, 496. Swinton, William, Decisive Battles, 371. Sykes, General, 249. Symposium, 35. Syracuse, 138. T