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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4: girlhood 1839-1843; aet. 20-23 (search)
ith some very agreeable partners, and talked as usual with Sumner, Hillard, George S. Hillard. Longo, Longfellow. etc. him a good knight without fear and without reproach. Charles Sumner was his alter ego, the brother of his heart; others of lifelong friend of all three sisters. Here Longfellow and Sumner often visited them, and here Julia first heard of the Chev over to the Perkins Institution. She has described how Mr. Sumner, looking out of a window, said, Oh! here comes Howe on agement was warmly welcomed by the friends of both. Charles Sumner writes to Julia:-- Howe has told me, with eyes pray let me ever be Your most affectionate friend, Charles Sumner. P. S. Sir Huldbrand has subdued the restless Unernoon, I found your note, and before reading it I read in Sumner's eyes your happiness. The great riddle of life is no lonured and glorified. You walk above in the June air, while Sumner and I, like the poor (sprites) in Faust, who were struggli
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
he Duchess of Sutherland; musical parties, at which Diva sang to the admiration of all. There were visits to the galleries, where George Combe was of the party, and where he and the Chevalier studied the heads of statues and busts from the point of view of phrenology, a theory in which both were deeply interested. They were presented to the Pope, Gregory XVI, who wished to hear about Laura Bridgman. The Chevalier visited all the public institutions, misnamed charitable, S. G. H. to Charles Sumner. and the schools, whose masters were amazed to find that he was an American, and asked how in that case it happened that he was not black! In her Reminiscences our mother records many vivid impressions of these Roman days. She had forgotten, or did not care to recall, a certain languor and depression of spirits which in some measure dimmed for her the brightness of the picture, but which were to give place to the highest joy she had yet known. On March 12, her first child was born,
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 6: South Boston 1844-1851; aet. 25-32 (search)
ut somehow it did plague me a little. I shall soon get used to it. Sumner has been dining with us, and he and Chev have been pitying unmarrieear them for me.... To the same Bordentown, August, 1846. ... Sumner and Chev came hither with us, and passed two days and nights here. Chev is well and good. Sumner is as usual, funny but very good and kind. Philanthropy goes ahead, and slavery will be abolished, and so sha her Dad, Quoth she, Oh, Daddy, where have you been? With Mann and Sumner a-putting down sin! To her sister Annie August 17, 1846. My discipline Society, which have been intensely interesting. Chev and Sumner have each spoken twice, in behalf of the Philadelphia system, and a speech drew tears from many eyes, and was very beautiful. Both of Sumner's have been fine, but the last, delivered last evening, was masterl busy for letter-writing during this year; the Doctor writes to Charles Sumner of the beauty of Boppart, and adds: Julia and I have been enjoy
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: passion flowers 1852-1858; aet. 33-39 (search)
ty. It was one of these parties of which the Doctor wrote to Charles Sumner: Altogether it was a good affair, a religious affair; I say rel knocked at the door, and she opened it herself. To all of us, Charles Sumner and his brothers, Albert and George, Hillard, Agassiz, Andrew, d fit naturally into the background of Green Peace. Of these Charles Sumner, always the Doctor's closest and best-beloved friend, is most ftall, she would say that a thing was so much higher or lower than Mr. Sumner. His deep musical voice, his rare but kindly smile, are not to b the winter of 1847, a young mother with two dear girl babies, when Sumner, I think, brought Whittier to our rooms and introduced him to me. Hs because he brought himself. I disagree with Sam Ward, said Charles Sumner, on almost every known topic: but when I have talked with him fpainful state of excitement relative to Kansas matters and dear Charles Sumner, whose condition gives great anxiety. In consequence of the
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: no. 13
Chestnut Street
, Boston 1864; aet. 45 (search)
solute, not a sanguine heart. I have no one to stand for me there, Sumner against me, Channing almost unknown to me, everyone else indifferen recalls an oft-quoted anecdote of the time. Our mother wished Charles Sumner to see and know Booth. One evening when the Senator was at the she told him of her wish. The next day she writes in her Journal: Sumner to tea. Made a rude speech on being asked to meet Booth. Said: I dFortunately, God Almighty had not, by last accounts, got so far. Sumner was told of this in her presence. What a strange sort of book, het be! You ought to strike that out immediately. She admired Charles Sumner heartily, but they disagreed on many points. He disapproved of and sincerity of his nature. So we disagree, but I love him. Mr. Sumner did not attend the readings, but he came to see her, and was, as ays, kind and friendly. After seeing him in the Senate she writes: Sumner looks up and smiles. That smile seems to illuminate the Senate.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the wider outlookv1865; aet. 46 (search)
ume of Kant back to the Athenaeum for the yearly rearrangement. Could not interest myself in anything.... Visited old Mrs. Sumner, The mother of Charles Sumner. whose chariot and horses are nearly ready. At this time there was some question oCharles Sumner. whose chariot and horses are nearly ready. At this time there was some question of selling Lawton's Valley for economic reasons. The exigency passed, but the following words show the depth of her feeling on the subject: If I have any true philosophy, any sincere religion, these must support me under the privation of the Valley.etism. It was Nature after Art, and his nature is much greater than Dana's art. A few days after this she writes: ... Sumner in the evening — a long and pleasant visit. He is a very sweet-hearted man, and does not grow old. The Musical FestiDr. Howe raised the money for this statue. meets William Hunt, who praises its simplicity and parental character; and Charles Sumner, who tells her it looks better on a nearer view. The day after--we abode in the Valley, when three detachments of
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: no. 19
Boylston place
: later Lyrics --1866; aet. 47 (search)
l, with great satisfaction. Prayed at bedtime that I might not become a superficial sham and humbug. Hearing that Charles Sumner had sought her at the house of Mrs. Eames, she sent a message to him by a common friend. She writes: Sumner cannot mSumner cannot make a visit at the hotel, but will see me at the Capitol. I know of nothing which exempts a man in public life from the duty of having, in private, some human qualities. Mr. Sumner did come to see her later, when she was staying with Mrs. Eames. SMr. Sumner did come to see her later, when she was staying with Mrs. Eames. She saw Secretary Seward, who was very ungracious to her; and President Johnson, whom she found not one inclined to much speech. Before the latter interview her prayer was: Let me be neither unskilful nor mean! The visit to Mrs. Eames was a sad onse delightful reading I thank God, praying never to act quite unworthily of its maxims. November 11. Called on Mrs. Charles Sumner, and saw both parties, who were very cordial and seemed very happy. November 15. Crackers, .25, eggs, .43, rose
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: concerning clubs 1867-1871; aet. 48-52 (search)
rkins Institution. Again, an extremely unfavorable critique of Later Lyrics in a prominent review distressed her greatly; her health was more or less disturbed; above all, the sudden death of John A. Andrew, the beloved and honored friend of many years, saddened both her and the Doctor deeply. All these things affected her spirits to some extent, so that the Journal for the remainder of 1867 is in a minor key. ... In despair about the house.... On hearing of the separation of Charles Sumner from his wife:-- For men and women to come together is nature — for them to live together is art — to live well, high art. November 21. Melancholy, thinking that I did but poorly last evening [at a reading from her Notes on Travel at the Church of the Disciples]. ... At the afternoon concert felt a savage and tearful melancholy, a profound friendlessness. In the whole large assembly I saw no one who would help me to do anything worthy of my powers and life-ideal. I have so dream
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 16: the last of Green Peace 1872-1876; aet. 53-57 (search)
led them. Was told to improvise a lecture on the spot. Did so. ... March 5. Went to hear the arguments in favor of rescinding the vote of censure against Charles Sumner... . [In 1872, Sumner introduced in the Senate of the United States a resolution that the names of battles with fellow-countrymen should not be continued iSumner introduced in the Senate of the United States a resolution that the names of battles with fellow-countrymen should not be continued in the Army Register, nor placed on the regimental colors of the United States. This measure was violently opposed; the Legislature of Massachusetts denounced it as an insult to the loyal soldiery of the Nation,... meeting the unqualified condemnation of the Commonwealth. For more than a year Sumner's friends, headed by John G. WSumner's friends, headed by John G. Whittier, strove to obtain the rescinding of this censure; it was not till 1874 that it was rescinded by a large majority.] March 10. A morning for work in my own room, so rare a luxury that I hardly know how to use it. Begin with my Greek Testament.... March 17. Radical Club. ... It was an interesting sitting, but I felt as
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 17: the woman's cause 1868-1910 (search)
auty and of climate, besides a great promise of future prosperity and eminence. Kansas Travel in Minnesota was living romance. Travel in Kansas is living history. I could not cross its borders, new as these are, without unlocking a volume of the past, written in blood and in prayer, and sealed with the forfeit of noble lives. A ghostly army of warriors seemed to escort me as I entered the fair, broad territory. John Brown, the captain of them, stretched his hand to the Capitol, and Sumner, and Andrew, and Howe were with him. Here was the stand made, here the good fight begun, which, before it was well under way, divided the thought and sentiment of Europe, as well as those of America. My tired spirit sought to shake off at this point the commonplace sense of weariness and annoyance. To be in Kansas, and that for work, not for pastime. To bring the woman's word where the man's rough sword and spade had once wrought together, this was poetry, not prose. To be cold, and h
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