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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 102 6 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 92 2 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 76 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 64 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 56 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 44 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 41 1 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 40 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 40 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 39 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Charles Sumner or search for Charles Sumner in all documents.

Your search returned 47 results in 13 document sections:

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
one divided from those on either side of it by a stone partition. Francis Marion Ward, died September 3rd, 1847. Erected by William Morse, dear Marion's friend. May 16. Gave my talk to the colored people, soon after two in the afternoon in their department. A pretty hexagonal platform had been arranged. Behind this was a fine portrait of Abraham Lincoln, with a vase of beautiful flowers [gladiolus and white lilies] at its base. I spoke of Dr. Channing, Garrison, Theodore Parker, Charles Sumner, John A. Andrew, Lucretia Mott, and Wendell Phillips, occupying about an hour. They gave me a fine basket of flowers and sang my Battle Hymn. Afterwards the Alabama cadets visited us. We gave them tea, cake and biscuits and I made a little speech for them. Winter and spring passed rapidly, each season bringing fresh interest. The picturesqueness of New Orleans, the many friends she made among its people, the men and women gathered from every corner of the world, well made up to her
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: more changes--1886-1888; aet. 67-69 (search)
es of having always lent his wit to the service of the old aristocratic party. Returned to Boston and took train for Weirs, New Hampshire, where arrived more dead than alive. She is at Newport now, and there are tender notes of pleasure with the Hall grandchildren, of reading and prayers with them on Sunday, of picnics and sailing parties. Still, in dreams, she calls back the lost daughter; still records with anxious care each visionary word and gesture. Dreamed this morning of Charles Sumner and dearest Julia. She was talking to me; part of the time reclining on a sort of lounge. I said to some one, This is our own dear Julia, feel how warm she is. .. .I think I said something about our wanting to see her oftener. She said pathetically, Can't you talk of me? I said, We do, darling. Not very often, I think was her reply. Then she seemed to come very near me, and I said to her, Darling, do they let you come here as often as you want to? She said, Not quite. I asked wh
I, 61, 88, 89, 90, 126, 151, 166, 192, 216, 268, 322, 343. Sullivan, Annie (Mrs. Macy), II, 262. Sullivan, Sir, Arthur, II, 9. Sullivan, Richard, II, 64. Sully, Due de, I, 192. Sumner, Mrs., I, 225. Sumner, Albert, I, 151. Sumner, Charles, I, 71, 74-77, 116, 121, 127, 133, 149, 151, 152, 153, 168, 200, 205, 206, 226, 227, 246, 283, 344, 381; II, 108, 128. Letter of, I, 75. Sumner, Mrs., Charles, I, 255, 283. Sumner, George, I, 151. Sutherland, Duchess of, I, 82, 85, Sumner, Mrs., Charles, I, 255, 283. Sumner, George, I, 151. Sutherland, Duchess of, I, 82, 85, 95. Sutherland, Duke of, I, 87. Swedenborg, Emanuel, I, 135. Swinburne, A. C., II, 72. Switzerland, I, 94, 278; I, 20. Syra, I, 272. Tacitus, I, 177, 222. Tacoma, II, 133, 153. Taft, W. H., II, 192, 388, 394. Taglioni, Marie, I, 97. Talbot, Emily, I, 287. Talleyrand, Princess, II, 247. Talmage, DeWitt, II, 101. Talmud, II, 46. Tappan, Caroline, II, 142. Tasso, Torquato, II, 32. Taverna, Contessa di, II, 253, 255. Taylor, Father, I, 72, 346.
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