hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

r, had a large following among the more prominent citizens. A paper headed The Platform of the Friends of United Southern Action, was numerously signed by representative citizens who loved Louisiana but dreaded discordant action. The executive committee of the Friends comprised, among others, the names of such men as E. Salomon, T. W. Collens, B. F. Jonas, A. Sambola, Thos. E. Adams, John Laidlaw, Riviere Gardere and Adolphe Mazureau. Among the Friends most respected in the city was Mr. Samuel Sumner, who for his courage in expressing his convictions was afterward sent to prison by General Butler. Opposed to these were the young men, whose voice clamored for the secession of Louisiana so soon as it could be legally effected. These youths held the reins with a firm, almost insolent grip in their confident hands. They left the trained and wary charioteers of the cause trailing far in the wake. While this struggle was going on, some of the artillerists of the city woke up on St.
onderance—125,000 effectives, with 280 guns. Briefly it may be said that McClellan had, at Seven Pines, committed a blunder. On the morning of May 31st he had rashly placed two of his best corps on the Richmond side of the Chickahominy, and the river, flood. ing its banks, cut them off from the rest of his army. Johnston at once hurled the bulk of his force against the isolated enemy. Throughout the first day the Confederates were doing their best to profit by the blunder. But steady Sumner crossed the river in force to help Keyes and Heintzelman, and, through his desperate effort, the Federals recovered on the second day what they had lost on the first. Both armies claimed the victory. The loss on both sides was heavy and about equally divided. In our number of casualties, however, we suffered a greater loss than they in the severe wound which, during the battle, had incapacitated General Johnston. Among the troops at Seven Pines, the Chasseurs-à--pied, of New Orleans,