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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 211 5 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 174 24 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 107 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 63 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 34 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 38 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 37 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 37 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Sumner or search for Sumner in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 5 document sections:

Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
Hill's battle and in place to be reinforced by Sumner, who came to his support in time to save him of Fair Oaks, the effort of which was to keep Sumner and Couch from the field at Seven Pines, and l reinforced by at least a strong division from Sumner's advance, with artillery, held his position aut that they were being rapidly reinforced [by Sumner], held a strong position, and extended beyond treat to the river. McClellan's rear guard, Sumner's corps, and Smith's division of Franklin's co without the aid of the infantry, Called by Sumner the battle of Allen's Farm. and Kershaw moved gan in earnest at 5:30 p. m. by the opening of Sumner's artillery on Kershaw's skirmishers under Gai2 killed and 8 wounded. It appears from General Sumner's report, that three corps, his own, Frank left the field, and crossed White Oak swamp. Sumner speaks of the assault by Kershaw and Semmes asre driven from the field of Savage Station. Sumner, having successfully guarded the passage of Wh[1 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
ght at Pleasant valley. On September 1st he continued his march, passed Chantilly, and came upon Pope's forces at Ox hill, just south of the turnpike, and about halfway between Chantilly and Germantown. General Pope had due notice of the advance on his right, and early on the 1st formed a determination, as he reports, to fight a battle between the roads which come together at Fairfax, on one of which he was stationed, Jackson, followed by Longstreet, marching on the other. Reinforced by Sumner's and Franklin's corps, General Pope arranged for battle on the 1st of September with a force of 57,000. The corps of Heintzelman, Reno and McDowell were in position south of the Little River turnpike, facing almost north. Against these corps General Jackson attacked on the afternoon of the 1st, the battle being fought during a storm of rain and wind, which blew directly in the faces of the Confederates. Jackson put his corps on right into line of battle, Hill, Lawton and Starke from righ
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
ts chosen line. The three corps of Hooker, Mansfield and Sumner were engaged in these battles with Jackson and Hood, whileoffensive, as against Hooker's and Mansfield's corps, when Sumner entered the battle. His advance was against Jackson's rigick's) moving against the woods just north of the church. Sumner's line operated at once to check the tide of his retreatinand Sedgwick attacked in front and north of the church. Sumner's account of affairs on the battlefield when he reached itield's corps were attacking farther to Jackson's left, and Sumner's fresh corps was terribly aggressive. General Lee had or back, broke its order, and gained the position from which Sumner had advanced. Sedgwick was overwhelmed, but Richardson retired in order. The attack of Sumner on Lee's left and left center had failed, and failed by reason of the heroic, aggressiey had come to the field from a well-provided camp. But Sumner's work was not yet done. Richardson and French, supported
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
l Burnside's army was arranged in three grand divisions—right, center and left—commanded by Generals Sumner, Hooker and Franklin. In each grand division there were six divisions, with cavalry and nuvalry on his immediate flanks, and twenty-three batteries with Franklin's wing and nineteen with Sumner's and Hooker's. In the battle, as reported by the chief of artillery, all of Franklin's batteries were engaged on the field (116 guns), and only seven batteries of Sumner's and Hooker's. To cover the crossing of the river on the 12th, General Hunt reported 147 guns in battery along the Stafford its battle. At 10 o'clock on the 13th, while Meade and, Gibbon were assaulting A. P. Hill, and Sumner and Hooker were throwing their divisions against Marye's hill, Kershaw was ordered to reinforce Ninth corps had now been beaten in detail in the attempt to carry the Confederate position. General Sumner's right grand division had been repulsed by three brigades and the artillery. General Burns
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
At the battle of Savage Station, June 29, 1862, he fell mortally wounded and died on the field. In the charge in which he lost his life, it is said that he was conspicuously prominent, moving hither and thither, animating and encouraging his men. And when his vitals had been pierced by a minie ball, he announced with the coolest intrepidity his condition to those around him, and then urged them forward with the words: Charge, boys, charge! Forward, my brave men! When night came on and General Sumner had withdrawn across White Oak swamp, Colonel Garlington's comrades found him lying straight upon his back, with his hands folded upon his breast, and his sword standing with the point in the ground by his side. How cool and self-possessed must have been his mind at that time. His attitude and features bespoke no thought of fear or even pain, so calm was he in that awful death hour when left alone with his God. Colonel Garlington was a man of high promise, both in the profession which