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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 211 5 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 174 24 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 107 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 63 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 34 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 38 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 37 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 37 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Sumner or search for Sumner in all documents.

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do but sit down and let our territory grow and expand like an oak tree. Then, with cotton as our safeguard, we should have peace with all the great nations of the earth. In the Southern Confederacy, Virginia will stand at the head, and be looked up to. In the Northern Confederacy, she will stand at the — he could not say tail, for Virginia could never stand at the tail of anything — but she would find herself degraded much lower than she is now. He blinded to the future possibility of Sumner, or Fred Douglas--one of Virginia's runaway negroes — being elected to the Presidency Thousands of men at the North, in their hatred for slavery, were ready to do this thing to humiliate the South. Give him war, pestilence, famine, anything sooner than that. With regard to the African slave trade, he said emphatically that the Southern Confederacy had done all it could to dispel the illusion in this respect. The South would never open the trade. There never was a greater delusion tha<