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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 211 5 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 174 24 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 107 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 63 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 34 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 38 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 37 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 37 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 1, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Sumner or search for Sumner in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

. The inevitable Edward Everett comes forward in a letter to Bonner's New York Ledger to account for this sympathy, and to unravel and explain the diplomatic mysteries connected with it. Mr. Everett doubtless has some other objects in view. Sumner and Wilson, the ultra abolitionists, of Boston, have shot far ahead of him of late years in political life. As violent an abolitionist as either of them, he long thought it most politic to take the conservative tack, and cultivate the favor of both South and North. Secession has left him high and dry in that path, and he now must "'bout face," and endeavor to outstrip Sumner and Wilson in the announcement of an extreme fanatical Northernism. He fancies himself, with probable truth, the best diplomatist in the whole North, imagines that his term in the State Department must come next after Seward's, and by way of attracting the attention of Lincoln's administration to himself, and of reminding the Northern public of his powers, airs h
Breckenridge) 32,751; Converse, (Union Democrat) 30,990. Captain T. J. Steeples, commanding the steamer Pacific, was shot at Portland, Oregon, on the 10th instant, whilst aiding to assist a gambler. He died a few days subsequently. General Sumner will leave on Monday, the 21st inst., by steamer for Washington, with nine companies of regulars under his command, who go to New York. One thousand United States arms go forward by the same steamer. Col. Wright succeeds General SumGeneral Sumner in the command of the Pacific Department, until Gen. Darer arrives. Commercial.--The market continues quote easy. Sight exchange to New York, 3┬Ża4 per cent. The question of danger to the treasure shipments from privateers is again agitated and some of the newspapers advocate a petition to Government to send a steam war vessel to Aspinwall at least once a month, to receive and convey the California treasure to New York. The markets for general merchandize is quiet, excepting a few