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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 211 5 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 174 24 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 107 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 63 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 34 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 38 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 37 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 37 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Sumner or search for Sumner in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: November 24, 1862., [Electronic resource], From Fredericksburg.--the surrender of the town Demanded. (search)
The delay in sending it to headquarters was such that the Mayor read it at 20 minutes to 5 o'clock. He at once wrote a dignified remonstrance. The summons stated that the town having afforded stores and clothing to the rebels, and the railroad offering facilities to our army, this state of things could no longer be suffered, and unless we surrendered by five o'clock P. M., he would give sixteen hours to remove the aged and infirm, when he should proceed to shell the town. It was signed by Sumner, but stated to be by authority of Burnside. He promised when the town was taken to afford such protection to property and persons as the Government of the United States has now determined on. This is not the precise wording of the promise, but its substance. We regarded it of course as a threat of harsh, rather than a promise of mild treatment. Our reply stated the impossibility of complying with the request, from the short time allowed and from the fact that they fired at the cars our ch