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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 211 5 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 174 24 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 107 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 63 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 34 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 38 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 37 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 37 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Sumner or search for Sumner in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 5 document sections:

The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1865., [Electronic resource], President's message.--General Grant's report. (search)
rities chosen by their own people," is the only efficient means of re-establishing harmony and insuring the rights and prosperity of the whole Union. It was not surprising that the calm and truthful communication of the President should excite Mr. Sumner's malignity, and that he should style it a "white-washing" message. Had the President recited as true the falsehoods relative to Southern cruelties to the blacks, and Southern disloyalty, which have been invented and circulated to help on the agitation against restoration, and for the degradation of the Southern white man, it would have been a marvelous proper document for Mr. Sumner. Our gratification being in proportion to that gentleman's discontent, of course we hail the short message with satisfaction. President Johnson states that "the people throughout the entire South evince a laudable desire to renew their allegiance to the Government, and to repair the devastation of war by a prompt and cheerful return to peaceful purs
then, will live, and he will be President. He has already expressed himself favorable to the reconstruction of the Union, and from that circumstance we deduce most favorable omens. He will reduce everything to order, according to his military instinct. He will seek to make the country as strong as it is possible to render it, and he knows that it cannot be made strong by fostering sectional prejudices and destroying the prosperity of the most productive portion of it. He is a little too enlightened for that. Besides, he is a soldier, and soldiers — genuine soldiers — do not love to torture the defenceless. Even the warriors of the savage tribes are wont to leave that part of the consequences of war to be wrought by the women and children. Such old squaws as Thad. Stevens and Sumner, who did none of the fighting, follow but their instincts in what they are doing now. But Grant is a man of different temper. He has no private griefs to interfere with his conduct as a public ma
The Debate on the message. Mr. Sumner said: We have a message from the President which is like the white-washing message of Franklin Pierce with regard to the atrocities in Kansas. Mr. Johnson, of Maryland, and Mr. Doolittle objected to MrMr. Sumner's adjective, and asked him to qualify the expression. Mr. Sumner.--I have nothing to qualify, nothing to modify, nothing to retract. In former days there was but one Kansas to suffer under illegal power. Now there are eleven Kansas suMr. Sumner.--I have nothing to qualify, nothing to modify, nothing to retract. In former days there was but one Kansas to suffer under illegal power. Now there are eleven Kansas suffering only as one suffered.--Therefore, sir, as eleven are more than one, so is the enormity of the present time more than the enormity of the days of Franklin Pierce. Nevertheless, after Messrs. Dixon and Doolittle had lectured him a little mays of Franklin Pierce. Nevertheless, after Messrs. Dixon and Doolittle had lectured him a little more explicitly. Mr. Sumner said he did not mean to impugn the patriotism or condemn the policy of the President; and so the matter was dropped.
ion propositions for the re-organization of the army. Senator Nye, of Nevada, will introduce in the Senate, in a few days, a bill to repeal the city charter of Washington. A delegation of Friends from Pennsylvania were at the White House a long time to-day, but did not succeed in obtaining an interview. Senator Doolittle obtained a long interview with the President this afternoon. The "disunionist" have received a check at least, if not a repulse, in the Senate to-day.--Mr. Sumner, who had expected to advance his cause by procuring the publication of reports of executive agents who have traversed the South since the practical close of the war, was badly set back. The report of General Grant, based upon actualities of a very late day, being sent in to the Senate, created a great sensation. To an experienced observer, the appearance of things on the Republican side indicates what Jack Falstaff denominated a state of general. "dissolution and thaw," looking to a
The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1865., [Electronic resource], President's message.--General Grant's report. (search)
20. --Senate.--Mr. Morrill reported the bill to regulate the elective franchise in the District of Columbia. Mr. Sumner hoped it would be acted on very soon. The country demanded it. Mr. Davis called Mr. Sumner to order, saying that Mr. Sumner to order, saying that the bill was not before the Senate for discussion. Mr. Wilson called up the Senate bill to maintain the freedom of the inhabitants of States lately in rebellion. Mr. Sumner addressed the Senate in favor of the bill. He said that when he thMr. Sumner addressed the Senate in favor of the bill. He said that when he thought of what occurred in the chamber yesterday, in an attempt to white-wash the unhappy condition of the rebel States, he felt that he ought to speak of nothing else here to-day. He read a number of letters from the South, private and public, to sh of two millions of people who did not vote for him at the late election. Mr. Cowan controverted the statements of Mr. Sumner, which he said were all based upon anonymous letters. House.--Mr. Stevens introduced a bill to double the pensions