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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
e D. Ramsay (retired Sept. 12, 1864) Brig.-Gen. Alexander B. Dyer. Bureau of military justice Major John F. Lee (resigned Sept. 4, 1862) Brig.-Gen. Joseph Holt. Bureau of the provost Marshal General (created by act of March 3, 1863) Brig.-Gen. James B. Fry. General officers of the United States army, January 1, 1861 Brevet Lieut.-Gen. Winfield Scott (General-in-chief) Brig.-General John E. Wool Brig.-General David E. Twiggs Brig.-General William S. Harney. (Note.-E. V. Sumner was promoted Brigadier-General March 16, 1861, vice David E. Twiggs, dismissed March 1, 1861.) * Afterward in the Confederate service. The United States Navy Department. Secretary of the Navy: Gideon Welles. Assistant Secretary: Gustavus V. Fox. Yards and Docks: Rear-Admiral Joseph Smith. Ordnance and Hydrography Captain George A. Magruder (dismissed April 22, 1861) Captain Andrew A. Harwood (relieved July 22, 1862) Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren (reliev
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Washington on the Eve of the War. (search)
. Lincoln), and arrived safe at Washington on the morning of the day he was to have passed through Baltimore. But the plotting to prevent his inauguration continued; and there was only too good reason to fear that an attempt would be made against his life during the passage of the inaugural procession from Willard's hotel, where Mr. Lincoln lodged, to the Capitol. On the afternoon of the 3d of March, General Scott held a conference at his headquarters, there being present his staff, General Sumner, and myself, and then was arranged the programme of the procession. President Buchanan was to drive to Willard's hotel, and call upon the President-elect. The two were to ride in the same carriage, between double files of a squadron of the District of Columbia cavalry. The company of sappers and miners were to march in front of the presidential carriage, and the infantry and riflemen of the District of Columbia were to follow it. Riflemen in squads were to be placed on the roofs of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
to the last, and, when absolved, shall take my course. All honest and competent witnesses now accord that he carried out this purpose in letter and spirit. General Sumner, who relieved him, reported that he found him carrying out the orders of the Government. Mr. Lincoln's Administration treated General Johnston with a distrert Sidney Johnston in the Federal army were as follows: Early in April, 1861, while on duty in the adjutant-generals office in Washington, I learned that Colonel Sumner had been dispatched incog. to California, with secret orders to assume command of the Department of the Pacific, and that this unusual course had been promptst important command and trust on your arrival here. Sidney is appointed to the Military Academy. This message reached General Johnston after the arrival of Colonel Sumner. In response to the above, and by the same channel of communication, I received this message: I thank you and my friends for efforts in my behalf. I have
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Notes of a Confederate staff-officer at Shiloh. (search)
the Pacific Coast, in which quarter I had served eight years. Having been at Washington during the momentous winter of 1860-61, I spoke of the fact that when Colonel Sumner had been sent via the Isthmus of Panama to supersede him (Johnston) in the command of the Department of the Pacific in April, 1861, Sumner's berth in the steaSumner's berth in the steamer had been taken under an assumed name, so that the newspapers might not get and divulge the fact of his departure on that errand in time for intelligence of it to reach the Pacific Coast by the overland route, and lead General Johnston to act with a supposed powerful disunion party in California in a revolt against the Federal authority before Sumner's arrival. Yes, answered the general, with much quiet feeling in his manner, while distrusting me sufficiently to act thus toward me, my former adjutant-general, Fitz John Porter, was induced to write me of their great confidence in me, and to say that it was their purpose to place me in command of the Fed