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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 318 8 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 292 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 114 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 92 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 40 2 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 28 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 27 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Edwin V. Sumner or search for Edwin V. Sumner in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Ball's Bluff and the arrest of General Stone. (search)
he United States. Governor Andrew sent the correspondence to Senator Sumner, who laid it before the Senate, and denounced Stone in unmeasurms. Stung to the quick, Stone instantly replied in a letter to Mr. Sumner, for which I need seek no better description or criticism than is. Adjutant-General Schouler ( Massachusetts in the War ) says, Mr. Sumner took no notice of Stone's letter. General Schouler was evidently not aware that Mr. Sumner took the letter at once to Mr. Lincoln, with the above result.--R. B. I. These circumstances, imperfectly known or understood, have caused many to suppose that Mr. Sumner was in some way the originator of General Stone's arrest; it is, however, as certain as any fact can be upon negative evidence, that Mr. Sumner had nothing whatever to do with the subsequent proceedings. The Committee on ch to them, in Mr. Wade's words. The resolution was supported by Mr. Sumner, and was passed against the opposition of the committee. Nine da
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
ons: Franklin, McCall, and King; Second Corps, Sumner — Divisions: Richardson, Blenker, and Sedgwickng opposition, to gain ground enough to enable Sumner and Heintzelman to support the attack to be maorders, and being convinced that the troops of Sumner and Franklin at Savage's Station were ample fohere to go, and I did occupy these lines. General Sumner's were more indefinite, and he occupied a been impossible. After Generals Franklin and Sumner had fallen back, my right flank and rear were he fearless commander of the Second Corps, General Sumner, thought it hazardous to remove them from , was so seriously threatened that I called on Sumner's Corps to send a brigade to its support. F first step was accomplished. During the 28th Sumner, Heintzelman, and Franklin held essentially thposted his division at that point and informed Sumner, who moved his Corps to the same place, arriving continued until after dark. About midnight Sumner's and Heintzelman's Corps and McCall's divisio[15 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.21 (search)
Hooker (Third Corps) were sent forward by two roads to support the column. General Sumner (the officer second in rank in the Army of the Potomac) was directed to proing bridge, and compelled to turn into the road by which Hooker was advancing. Sumner accompanied Smith's column, and, immediately on the arrival before Williamsburgece of woods which screened the Confederate rifle-pits. The result is given in Sumner's official report as follows: After entering the woods I found the underbruasey, and Couch struggling on toward the front, over crowded, muddy roads. General Sumner says in his report: I had a careful reconnoissance made on the left of casualties. During his desperate engagement, Hooker reported his situation to Sumner, and Kearny was promptly ordered up with his division, while Heintzelman, the pnter charge, led by Hancock, in which the bayonet was used in open field. Generals Sumner, Keyes, and Smith all mentioned Hancock's victory, which was brilliant and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. The composition, losses, and strength of each army as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union forces. Major-General George B. McClellan. Brigadier-General Edwin V. Sumner, second in command. Third Army Corps, Brigadier-General Samuel P. Heintzelman. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Joseph Hooker. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cuvier Grover: 1st Mass., Col. Robert Cowdin; 11th Mass., Col. William Blaisdell; 2d N. H., Col. Gilman Marston; 26th Pa., Col. William F. Small (w), Major Casper M. Berry. Brigade loss: k, 33; w, 186; m, 34 == 253. Second Brigade, Col. Nelson Taylor: 70th N. Y., Col. William Dwight, Jr. (w c), Major Thomas Holt: 72d N. Y.. Lieut.-Col. Israel Moses; 73d N. Y.. Col. William R. Brewster; 74th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Charles H. Burtis. Brigade loss: k, 191; w, 349; m, 232
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
st of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union Army. Major-General George B. McClellan. Second Army Corps, Brig.-Gen. Edwin V. Sumner. first division, Brig.-Gen. Israel B. Richardson. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Oliver 0. Howard (w), Col. Thomas J. Parker: 5th N. H., Col. E. E. Cross (w), Lieut.-Col. Samuel G. Langley; 61st N. Y., Col. Francis C. Barlow; 64th N. Y., C = 6134. Relative strength of the opposing forces. The following synopsis, from the Records and other data, is by General Gustavus W. Smith: The Union Army numbered 98,008, of which about 5000 were on detached service: Present for duty, Sumner's Corps, 17,412; Heintzelman's Corps, 16,999; Keyes's Corps, 17,132; Porter's Corps, 17,546; Franklin's Corps, 19,580; Engineers, Cavalry and Provost Guard, 4767. Each corps was composed of two divisions of nearly equal strength. The aggregat
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
s on the bridges, awaited further orders. General Sumner says: At 2:30 o'clock P. M. I received the Couch was informed that the leading troops of Sumner's corps were closely approaching. Couch halte-G. W. S. On the map in his book he represents Sumner's corps in one line facing west, its left on tth Longstreet's and Huger's divisions close on Sumner's left flank and rear. Having thus placed the after which his troops could not have made Sumner's March to reenforce Couch at Fair Oaks Statioon with Sumner's corps. In fact, the lines of Sumner and Heintzelman overlapped here at the time the Confederate attack was made. Sumner's corps (instead of being drawn up in one line, facing nearlyhich he says: The next attack will be from Sumner's division. I think that if we can whip it weridges, was recalled and hurriedly sent by General Sumner to Richardson's assistance. It will be hief of staff of McClellan's army wrote to General Sumner: The general commanding says, in reply to [19 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
s B. McIntyre. Volunteer Engineer Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Daniel P. Woodbury: 15th N. Y., Col. J. McLeod Murphy; 50th N. Y., Col. Charles B. Stuart. Brigade loss: m, 12. Battalion U. S. Engineers, Capt. James C. Duane. Loss: w, 2; m, 9==11. Casey's Command (at White House), Brig.-Gen. Silas Casey: 4th Pa. Cav. (squadron), Capt. William Shorts; 11th Pa. Cav. (5 co's), Col. Josiah Harlan; F, 1st N. Y. Arty., Capt. Wm. R. Wilson; 93d N. Y. (6 co's), Col. Thos. F. Morris. Second Corps, Brig.-Gen. E. V. Sumner. Staff loss: w, 1, Cavalry: D, F, H, and K, 6th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Duncan McVicar. first division, Brig.-Gen. Israel B. Richardson. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John C. Caldwell: 5th N. H., Lieut.-Col. Samuel G. Langley, Capt. Edward E,, Sturtevant; 7th N. Y., Col. George W. von Schack; 61st N. Y., Col. Francis C. Barlow; 81st Pa., Col. Charles F. Johnson (w), Lieut.-Col. Ell T. Conner (k), Maj. H. Boyd McKeen. Brigade loss: k, 61; w, 356; m, 137 == 554. Second Brigade, Brig.-G
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
king ground from which we had been pressed and which it was necessary to occupy in order to hold our position. The enemy were repulsed in every direction. An ominous silence reigned. It caused the inference that their troops were being gathered and massed for a desperate and overwhelming attack. To meet it, our front line was concentrated, reenforced, and arranged to breast the avalanche, should it come. I again asked for additional reenforcements. French's and Meagher's brigades, of Sumner's corps, were sent forward by the commanding general, but did not arrive till near dark. At 2 P. M., when I took my station beyond the Watts house, my anxieties and responsibilities had been substantially relieved, at least so far as related to the establishment of a line of battle, in which all engaged felt their power to resist attack. At that time the practicability of our defensive position, in charge of troops having implicit confidence in each other, had been demonstrated by the su
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
next on the left. Going toward the left, General Sumner's corps came next, then General Heintzelmabe at Savage's Station, in reserve. Then came Sumner's corps and Heintzelman's. Keyes's corps was tthe fight was begun. I immediately sought General Sumner, to inform him of the situation and get int of the enemy; at the same time informing General Sumner of the conditions in front. He would not o check the turning movement of the enemy, and Sumner, when he realized that Heintzelman had withdra after the fight was ended, I suggested to General Sumner that if he had no objection I would carry utenant Mathew Berry, his aide-de-camp, to General Sumner. After the introduction, Lieutenant Berryan had a conference with the corps commanders (Sumner, Heintzelman, and Franklin), and when it was eof Sedgwick's division, which were sent by General Sumner upon information of the danger. There wasendale. Toward sundown, at the request of General Sumner, Caldwell's and Meager's brigades of Richa[18 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan's change of base and Malvern Hill. (search)
He replied that the road was obstructed by fallen timber. So there were five divisions within sound of the firing, and within supporting distance, but not one of them moved. Longstreet and A. P. Hill made a desperate fight, contending against Sumner's corps, and the divisions of McCall, Kearny, and Hooker; but they failed to gain possession of the Quaker road, upon which McClellan was retreating. That night Franklin glided silently by them. He had to pass within easy range of the artilleryith great fierceness on both sides, and, for a moment, it seems as if the Confederates are at last about to penetrate the very center of their adversaries and of the formidable artillery, which but now was dealing destruction in their ranks. But Sumner, who commands on the right, detaches Sickles's and Meagher's brigades successively to Couch's assistance. During this time, Whiting on the left, and Huger on the right, suffer Hill's soldiers to become exhausted without supporting them. Neither
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