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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 26 4 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Job Sumner or search for Job Sumner in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
ts. The grandfather of Charles Sumner. Job Sumner was born in Milton, April 23, 1754. The houhe college on the fourth of that month, that Job Sumner of Milton, having applied for admission to Hient elm which still attracts many a pilgrim. Sumner did not follow his teachers to Concord, but, ird, Dr. Lathrop, and the Treasurer), that Major Job Sumner, who was admitted into the University A. s are preserved. The following sketch of Major Sumner is combined from two manuscript sketches leetreat from Canada. In one of these regiments Sumner was a lieutenant,— healthful, active, and inteJournals of Congress, Vol. V. p. 140. Captain Sumner was placed at the head of a company of ligactive and faithful outposts. For some days Sumner had charge of the guard of Major Andre, while cuation of the city by the British troops. Major Sumner was his second in command. General Hull and this tomb contains the remains of Major Job Sumner, of the Massachusetts line of the same ar
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. Charles Pinckney Sumner, the son of Major Job Sumner, was born in Milton, a suburb of Boston. His name was at first Job, but was afterwards changed to Charles Pinckney by his father, who probably had friendly relations with the South Carolina statesman. Charles Pinckney Sumner contributed, with the signature of An Elderly Man, a sketch of Charles Pinckney to the Patriot and Mercantile Advertiser, March 4. 1823. The boy passed his early childhood on the farm of the parish sexton, working hard, and attending in winter the public school. On Aug. 15, 1829, he wrote, I had but little time to enjoy the society of anybody. I scarcely remember the time from my eighth to my twelfth year, when all the summer long I did not perform half the labor of a man in the field from sunrise to nearly sundown, in the long summer days, and after that go every night about a mile, all over the Milton Church land, for the cows. He then entered Phillips
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 4: College Life.—September, 1826, to September, 1830.—age, 15-19. (search)
the same moment, and every arm made the same angle. Here the preserved sheets of the journal end. There were probably others which were mislaid. It is only known further that at New York he visited, at his father's request, the grave of Major Job Sumner, in St. Paul's Churchyard, and wrote a description and drew a sketch of the memorial stone. The notes of this excursion on foot show how simple were Sumner's tastes and mode of living in his early life. He enjoyed the primitive fare of tSumner's tastes and mode of living in his early life. He enjoyed the primitive fare of the farm-house and of the obscure inn. He made no complaint of his food or of the hardships of a traveller on foot. He observed every thing as he went,—farms, fences, crops, style of buildings, landscapes, canals, and trade. But his journal was the fullest and his interest the greatest when he visited places which were associated with events, whether purely local or connected with Indian hostilities, the Revolutionary period, or the earlier wars of France and England. He sought these with en
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 5: year after College.—September, 1830, to September, 1831.—Age, 19-20. (search)
Chapter 5: year after College.—September, 1830, to September, 1831.—Age, 19-20. Sumner left Cambridge with grateful recollections of college life. Revisiting, as the new academic year opened, the familiar scenes, he saw the Seniors taking possession of the rooms which his class had vacated, and described, in a letter to Browne, the desolation of 23 Holworthy. He kept up his interest in the exhibitions, parts, prizes, clubs, and personal incidents of the college, and reported them to the on to the Greek and Latin Classics, and said, I should certainly think it indispensable to every one who loves the old Latin and Greek writers and venerable tomes as you do, as soon as he begins to form his library. Soon after leaving college, Sumner sought an ushership in the Boston Latin School, but did not succeed in obtaining it. He was pressed by Stearns, then teaching an academy at Northfield, to become his assistant, and afterwards to take the sole charge of the institution; the latter