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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
some extent for his remissness in having allowed McCausland, with a force not one-half as large as his own, to reach Chambersburg. On this same August 7th, Hunter was relieved from command at his own request, made upon finding that Grant had determined practicably to supersede him. This officer whose achievements had been in inverse ratio to his barbarities, now sank from view, destined to add, afterwards, but one more to his claims for distinction, in presiding over the court that hung Mrs. Surat. The defeat of Crook, and the advance on Chambersburg had caused Grant to send up two divisions of cavalry, from Richmond. Now Sheridan was put in command of all the forces gathered to crush Early. Grant had come up himself to see the situation. He added to the Federal forces in the Valley until they numbered, by the returns for August, 56,618 present for duty, (of which some 5,000 or 6,000 were on garrison duty) and gave orders for a vigorous following up and attack upon Early. Early
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
some extent for his remissness in having allowed McCausland, with a force not one-half as large as his own, to reach Chambersburg. On this same August 7th, Hunter was relieved from command at his own request, made upon finding that Grant had determined practicably to supersede him. This officer whose achievements had been in inverse ratio to his barbarities, now sank from view, destined to add, afterwards, but one more to his claims for distinction, in presiding over the court that hung Mrs. Surat. The defeat of Crook, and the advance on Chambersburg had caused Grant to send up two divisions of cavalry, from Richmond. Now Sheridan was put in command of all the forces gathered to crush Early. Grant had come up himself to see the situation. He added to the Federal forces in the Valley until they numbered, by the returns for August, 56,618 present for duty, (of which some 5,000 or 6,000 were on garrison duty) and gave orders for a vigorous following up and attack upon Early. Early