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to the right, through Jonesboro, to destroy the stores there, and three companies of the Eighth Iowa, in charge of Captain Sutherland, my Assistant Adjutant-General, to the left six miles, to destroy Sanders' Iron Works, which they accomplished, rejmping that night twenty-five miles from Northport at King's store, and sending a company of the Sixth Kentucky with Captain Sutherland, my A. A. G., on the upper Columbus road, with directions to cross the Sipsey, turn south, and join me. April siry, and aide to the General commanding the corps, I am obliged for his valuable services so cheerfully rendered. Captain Sutherland, A. A. General, was of great service to me until sent on a reconnoissance towards Columbus, from which he found it ler Major 6th Kentucky Brig.-General J. T. Croxton,   Edmund Penn Captain 6th Kentucky Brig.-General J. T. Croxton,   Sutherland Captain and A. A. G. 6th Kentucky Brig.-General J. T. Croxton,   Baker Capt. and A. A. I. G. 6th Kentucky Brig.-Genera
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Chapter 10: foreign influence: summary (search)
foreign soil, when he is dealing with matters peculiarly within his own province of understanding. Garrison's personal relations with the British philanthropists can best be understood by reflecting upon his social isolation in America and upon the natural warmth of temperament in himself and in these English friends. I did not hear without great emotion that you are returned to England, and I look forward with great happiness to meeting you in these better times, writes the Duchess of Sutherland in 1867. Harriet Martineau wrote just before her death in 1876: I can say no more. My departure is evidently near, and I hold the pen with difficulty. Accept the sympathy and reverent blessing of your old friend, Harriet Martineau. I have watched his career with no common interest, even when I was too young to take much part in public affairs; and I have kept within my heart his name and the names of those who have been associated with him in every step he has taken. It is John Br
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
h, Dr. J. B. McFerrin preached nine times in Dalton, and I preached as often. Rev. Dr. Stiles, of Virginia, a Presbyterian minister, preached several times with great power and much profit to the soldiers and preachers. Rev. Mr. Caldwell, of the same Church, preached three or four times with good success. Rev. Mr. Flynn preached more than once. He, too, was a Presbyterian; also, Rev. Mr. Wood. Missionary Mooney five times, Miller three times, and R. P. Ransom, H. H. Kavanaugh, and Captain Sutherland, Twenty-third Alabama, and Alabama Conference; Chaplain W. A. Parks, Fifty-second Georgia, and Georgia Conference, each preached once or oftener, and others may have preached in my absence that I did not hear, besides these named. I only mention such as I heard. Nearly every time there was preaching penitents were called, and we would have from two to fifteen to come forward and from one to four professions nightly. I went to the front two or three Sundays, at Tilton, where I found
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
are the greenest spots on her island. We Americans cheated ourselves most egregiously when we thought England—once the head of the slavetrade, and only a few years ago the front of the abolitionism of the world—would turn her slavery-hating back on the only organized band of slavery propagandism on the earth! Poor fools we! Just as though the British aristocracy—the true name for the British Government—meant anything but interference and trouble for us when her Grace the Duchess of Sutherland chaperoned the gifted Harriet Beecher Stowe through the court of her Majesty, simply because Mrs. Stowe, by writing a great dramatic novel against slavery, could be made a cat's-paw to pull the chestnuts of the British aristocracy out of the fire! Yes, abolitionism suited the purposes of the British aristocracy just then; and lords and ladies swarmed at negro-emancipation gatherings at Exeter Hall. On all such occasions three standing jokes were played off, to the infinite amusement o
are the greenest spots on her island. We Americans cheated ourselves most egregiously when we thought England—once the head of the slavetrade, and only a few years ago the front of the abolitionism of the world—would turn her slavery-hating back on the only organized band of slavery propagandism on the earth! Poor fools we! Just as though the British aristocracy—the true name for the British Government—meant anything but interference and trouble for us when her Grace the Duchess of Sutherland chaperoned the gifted Harriet Beecher Stowe through the court of her Majesty, simply because Mrs. Stowe, by writing a great dramatic novel against slavery, could be made a cat's-paw to pull the chestnuts of the British aristocracy out of the fire! Yes, abolitionism suited the purposes of the British aristocracy just then; and lords and ladies swarmed at negro-emancipation gatherings at Exeter Hall. On all such occasions three standing jokes were played off, to the infinite amusement o
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
izabeth Fry and her family, Lord Morpeth, the Duchess of Sutherland, and many other Quaker and non-Quaker friends of the hosher from Birney, another from myself, &c. The Duchess of Sutherland, (who ranks next to the Queen, and Lib. 11.195. is celef Argyll. and Lord Morpeth, Brother of the Duchess of Sutherland. Of this enlightened nobleman Mr. Garrison afterwards wRemond. Ante, p. 383. Hall the other day. The Duchess of Sutherland has signified her wish to see him also at her palace. Yxcept Thursday. Let me know immediately. The Duchess of Sutherland is so pleased, she has requested me to make a sketch for July 1, 1840. Wednesday evening. Ms. The Duchess of Sutherland wishes to see you. Let me beg of you to call as soon [as for the Life of Haydon, 3.158, Anne Knight. Duchess of Sutherland, and sketched Miss Knight. [July] 9th. It seems nerison sat to-day after calling and seeing the Duchess of Sutherland, with whom he was delighted. Household and Duchess bewi
Thompson, 1.436, subscribes for Lib., 2.35, letter to Lieber, 81.—Portrait in Life. Son of Sumner, Charles Pinckney [d. 1839, aged 63], 2.29. Sun (N. Y.), 1.521. Sunderland, La Roy, Rev. [b. April 22, 1804; d. Hyde Park, Mass., May 15, 1885], career, 1.236; warns G. of plot, 236; opposes enrolment of women, 2.297; at G.'s address, 358. Sussex, Duke of [1773-1843], patron of Cresson, 1.365, 367, presides at meeting, 367; letters from G., 365, 368, unanswered, 366, 368. Sutherland, Duchess of [1806-1868], meets G., 2.385, 387, bespeaks his portrait, 387, 390; attentions to Remond, 388. Swain, David Lowry [1801-1868], 2.62. Swain, William, assistant of Lundy, 1.91. Swain, William, portrait painter in Newburyport, 1824-1831, 1.55. Swift, John, 2.216, 218. Tappan, Arthur [b. Northampton, Mass., May 22, 1786; d. New Haven, Conn., July 23, 1865], career, 1.91, meets Lundy, 91, releases G. from jail, 190; aid to Lib., 237, to G. against kidnapping, 241, for journ
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 8 (search)
--Mr. Mann's version is that of the politician. Mr. Mann's recent speech in August, 1852, has the same non-committal tone to which I have alluded in Mr. Sumner's. While professing, in the most eloquent terms, his loyalty to the Higher Law, Mr. Sutherland asked: Is there, in Mr. Mann's opinion, any conflict between that Higher Law and the Constitution? If so, what is it? If not so, why introduce an irrelevant topic into the debate? Mr. Mann avoided any reply, and asked not to be interrupted! Is that the frankness which becomes an Abolitionist? Can such concealment help any cause? The design of Mr. Sutherland is evident. If Mr. Mann had allowed there was no conflict between the Higher Law and the Constitution, all his remarks were futile and out of order. But if he asserted that any such conflict existed, how did he justify himself in swearing to support that instrument?--a question our Free Soil friends are slow to meet. Mr. Mann saw the dilemma, and avoided it by silence!
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, The woman's rights movement and its champions in the United States. (search)
occurred one day, at a large dinner party, at Samuel Gurney's,--a wealthy banker who had a beautiful country-seat near London. Lord Morpeth and the Duchess of Sutherland had been invited to meet a party of Americans there, as they had expressed a wish to see the American abolitionists. As it was a warm, pleasant afternoon in Jue close Miss Grew took her father's arm, and, in a cool, self-possessed manner, walked across the intervening space, and introduced her father to the Duchess of Sutherland, then mistress of the robes, with the same air as she would have presented two plain republicans in her own country. Standing near the daughter of Sir Fowell Bral views, Mrs. Mott was shunned by the Orthodox Quakers of England, though courted by the literati and nobility. I have seen her by the side of the Duchess of Sutherland, conversing on the political questions of the time with a grace and eloquence that proved her in manners the peer of the first woman in England, though educate
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 13: England.—June, 1838, to March, 1839.—Age, 27-28. (search)
Richard Cobden, who was not as yet a member of Parliament. of Fitzwilliam, Lansdowne, Wharncliffe (and his son, John Stuart Wortley), Leicester, Holland, Carlisle (and his son, Lord Morpeth), among noblemen. He met on a familiar footing Charles Austin, Macaulay, Landor, Leigh Hunt, Thomas Campbell, and Theodore Hook. He talked with Wordsworth at his home, and looked with him on the landscapes which had inspired his verse. Among women to whose society he was admitted were the Duchess of Sutherland, Mrs. Montagu, Joanna Baillie, Mrs. Jameson, Mrs. Sarah Austin, Miss Martineau, Mrs. Shelley, Mrs. Marcet, Mrs. Grote, Lady Morgan, Mrs. Norton, and Lady Blessington. With some of these persons the acquaintance was only temporary; with others there followed a correspondence more or less frequent, and a renewal of intercourse in later visits to Europe: and there were those, like Lord Morpeth, Robert Ingham, Joseph Parkes, and Mr. and Mrs. Montagu, with whom a lifelong friendship was establ
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