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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
rated here for his wit and various endowments. The two handsomest women I have seen are Mrs. Norton and the Duchess of Sutherland — the former of these rather a haughty beauty, with flashing eye and swelling lip, and dress too low for our notions ofthirteen servants in the hall, powdered heads, Lady Carlisle very like Morpeth--Lady Mary Howard not pretty; Duchess of Sutherland, beautiful, but like Lizzie Hogg. They gave us strawberries, the first we have tasted, green peas, pines, peaches, apr, with Marchioness to match; side dishes, I presume, but did not inquire. I have just been breakfasting at the Duke of Sutherland's superb palace. I will tell you next time about it. Lady Carlisle says I am nice and pretty, oh! how I love her! . .ream. There were balls as gorgeous as those of London, with the beautiful Princess Torlonia in place of the Duchess of Sutherland; musical parties, at which Diva sang to the admiration of all. There were visits to the galleries, where George Combe w
lbert, I, 151. Sumner, Charles, I, 71, 74-77, 116, 121, 127, 133, 149, 151, 152, 153, 168, 200, 205, 206, 226, 227, 246, 283, 344, 381; II, 108, 128. Letter of, I, 75. Sumner, Mrs., Charles, I, 255, 283. Sumner, George, I, 151. Sutherland, Duchess of, I, 82, 85, 95. Sutherland, Duke of, I, 87. Swedenborg, Emanuel, I, 135. Swinburne, A. C., II, 72. Switzerland, I, 94, 278; I, 20. Syra, I, 272. Tacitus, I, 177, 222. Tacoma, II, 133, 153. Taft, W. H., II, 192, 3Sutherland, Duke of, I, 87. Swedenborg, Emanuel, I, 135. Swinburne, A. C., II, 72. Switzerland, I, 94, 278; I, 20. Syra, I, 272. Tacitus, I, 177, 222. Tacoma, II, 133, 153. Taft, W. H., II, 192, 388, 394. Taglioni, Marie, I, 97. Talbot, Emily, I, 287. Talleyrand, Princess, II, 247. Talmage, DeWitt, II, 101. Talmud, II, 46. Tappan, Caroline, II, 142. Tasso, Torquato, II, 32. Taverna, Contessa di, II, 253, 255. Taylor, Father, I, 72, 346. Tebbets, Mrs., II, 227. Tennyson, Alfred, Lord, I, 160; II, 203, 227, 247. Terry, Louisa, I, 267, 268, 352; II, 12-14, 16, 28, 29, 32, 55, 60, 65, 67, 172-75, 235, 236, 238, 256. Letter to, II, 94. Terry, Luther, I,
lion Valley Reserves: McCune, Samuel, major. Third Infantry regiment (formerly Third battalion): Callcote, Alexander D., major, lieutenant-colonel; Mayo, Joseph, Jr., lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Pryor, Roger A., colonel; Pryor, William H., lieutenant-colonel: Scott, Joseph V., major, lieutenant-colonel. Third Infantry regiment Local Defense Troops (Departmental): Baker, Bolling, major; Henley, John A., major; Jamison, S. G., major; McAnerney, John, Jr., lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Sutherland, S. F., major, lieutenant-colonel. Third Militia regiment, Seventh brigade: Hottel, J. A., lieutenant-colonel; Newell, John H., major; Sibert, James H., colonel. Third regiment Reserves: Booker, Richard A., colonel; Ewers, William M., major; Leftwich, Joel B., lieutenant-colonel. Third Infantry regiment State Line: Breckenridge, P. G., major; Clarkson, John N., colonel; Swann, Thomas B., lieutenant-colonel. Fourth Heavy Artillery regiment (ordered known as Thirty-fourth Virgini
with the Fifth corps crossed Hatcher's run, and struck the Southside railroad, north of Five Forks; then, meeting with no opposition, he marched rapidly towards Sutherland, and came up in flank and rear of the enemy opposing Miles, just as Humphreys was returning on the right from Petersburg. Miles, in the interval, had devisedowards Petersburg, and advanced in that direction about two miles, when he met Humphreys with Hays's division coming up to his relief. He thereupon returned to Sutherland and went into bivouac. The troops which he had encountered belonged to Heth and Wilcox's divisions, and possibly a few to Anderson's command. Pickett, we have seen, had endeavored to reach Sutherland during the day, having been ordered thither by Lee, but he found the road filled with unarmed fugitives from the battle, and concluded to cross the Appomattox without delay. When Grant heard of the action at Sutherland, he declared to Meade: Miles has made a big thing of it, and deser
everywhere were jubilant, grimacing and dancing with delight. Where are the rebels? said Sheridan to a colored patriarch, leaning on a fence and doing uncouth homage with a tattered hat. Siftina souf, sah; siftina souf, was the apt reply. Newhall's With Sheridan in Lee's Last Campaign. As the only hope of the rebel commander now must be to unite with Johnston, Grant was of course extremely anxious in regard to the movements of Sherman, and this night sent him a long dispatch from Sutherland. After reciting the great events before Petersburg, he proceeded to direct the operations in North Carolina so as to combine them with his own; for Sherman's army, though a hundred and fifty miles away, was now more than ever only a wing of Grant's command. The battle-field reached from Richmond to Raleigh and Goldsboro. If Lee goes beyond Danville, said Grant, you will have to take care of him with the force you have for a while. Should he do so, you will want to get on the railroad
a degree; and the City of London presented him with its freedom. Early in July he visited Belgium, and afterward passed up the Rhine to Switzerland and Northern Italy. At Brussels, Frankfort, Cologne, Geneva, and Berne he was the object of public or official courtesies. The Grand Duke of Baden invited him to his villa near Constance, and Garibaldi sent him a message of welcome while he was at Varese. At Ragatz I left him for a week to arrange for his tour in Scotland. The Dukes of Sutherland and Argyll had asked me to bring him to them if he went as far north as their seats of Inverary and Dunrobin, and I now wrote to them to propose his visits. In a few days he arrived in England and at once went to Edinburgh and the Highlands, even extending his trip to John O'Groat's House, the extreme northern point of the island. By October he had returned to the south of England, stopping at Glasgow, Newcastle, Sheffield, Leeds, Sunderland, Leamington, Stratford, and Warwick, on his wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
30, ‘64, ordered to report for duty with 50th Alabama. Scull, Benjamin F., Surgeon. Passed Board at Bowling Green Feb. ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, Senior Surgeon 2d Brigade, Cleburne's Division, 18th Arkansas. Aug. 31, ‘63, 2d and 15th Arkansas. Sutherland, A. J., Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War Sept. 26, ‘62, to rank from June 28, ‘62. Dec. 31st Foard's Hospital, Chattanooga, Jan. 26, ‘63, ordered by Gen. Bragg to report to Wheeler for duty with 3d Cavalry. Spruell, Thomas W. 9, ‘63, assigned by Foard to Academy Hospital. July 11, ‘63, Medical Purveyor Wheeler's Corps. Stuart, J. D., Surgeon, on duty by order of Secretary of War April 21, ‘63, to report to Medical-Director Ramsay. Sept. 30, ‘63, 65th Georgia. Sutherland, T. A., Assistant Surgeon, on duty at Headquarters, reported to E. A. F., Feb. 7, ‘64. Feb. 7, ‘64, ordered to report to Lieutenant-General Hardee, Feb. 29, ‘64, 8th Mississippi. Sykes, A. J., contract $100 by General Ro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
six times our number we could not have prevented their advance. But General Butler greatly exaggerated our force, and I have always believed that his examination of Captain Koontz had something to do with his false impression. As it was, these two regiments held his army at bay (or at ocean, perhaps I should say) the entire day, which was Christmas, 1864. By pushing our line close to his we escaped much injury from the ships' guns, their shells passing over our heads. We had the help of Sutherland's Battery of artillery and Lipscomb's South Carolina cavalry. During the night the troops began to come in from our division. But a reconnoissance the next morning showed that General Butler had taken advantage of the darkness, re-embarked his army, and abandoned his expedition. The navy had bombarded Fort Fisher for two days, but inflicted slight loss. Kirkland's bold and spirited defense must have convinced Butler that we had a large force, as Koontz had told him that Longstreet wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
g the overpowering columns of Meade, and in delaying their advance to Five Forks. In these two fights a number of the best and bravest fell among the killed and wounded, among whom were Lieutenant-Colonel Harrison, of the 34th; Captain Barksdale, of the 59th, and Lieutenant Barksdale Warwick, of my staff, who died with a smile of the guadia certaminis on his face, struck whilst waving his sword and shouting Charge! Charge! On the night of the 31st we fell back across Hatcher's Run to Sutherland's on the S. S. R. Road and pressed forward after Hunton to reinforce Pickett at Five Forks. On Sabbath morning the 1st April, we reached Church Crossings, and were kneeling to God, under the prayers of Chaplain W. E. Wiatt of the 26th, when an order announced the defeat of Pickett at Five Forks and that we must fall back to the Appomattox. On Sunday at noon we reached the Namozine creek, and lodged our right on its banks. The enemy came up immediately, whilst we were throwing up breast-
with the Fifth corps crossed Hatcher's run, and struck the Southside railroad, north of Five Forks; then, meeting with no opposition, he marched rapidly towards Sutherland, and came up in flank and rear of the enemy opposing Miles, just as Humphreys was returning on the right from Petersburg. Miles, in the interval, had devisedowards Petersburg, and advanced in that direction about two miles, when he met Humphreys with Hays's division coming up to his relief. He thereupon returned to Sutherland and went into bivouac. The troops which he had encountered belonged to Heth and Wilcox's divisions, and possibly a few to Anderson's command. Pickett, we have seen, had endeavored to reach Sutherland during the day, having been ordered thither by Lee, but he found the road filled with unarmed fugitives from the battle, and concluded to cross the Appomattox without delay. When Grant heard of the action at Sutherland, he declared to Meade: Miles has made a big thing of it, and deser
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