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angdon, Clossin, Shipley, Jackson, Pennington, Seeley, and Taylor, merit my warmest encomiums for the coolness and deliberation with which they performed, without one exception, their duty under a heavy continuous shower of shot, shells, and splinters for two successive days. Lieutenant Todd, ordnance officer, had full supplies of all required articles, which were on hand at the post, and his department was conducted with system and efficiency. Major Tower, Surgeon Campbell, and Assistant Surgeon Sutherland, in their respective duties, sustained their high reputations. Captains Robertson, Duryea, and Blunt, and Lieutenants Pennington and Seeley respectively commanded batteries Lincoln, Scott, Totten, and Cameron, and a small battery at Spanish Fort, and the other officers batteries in the fort with distinguished ability. Captains Dobies' and Bailey's companies were with the batteries at Lincoln and Cameron, and did their duty faithfully and efficiently. The companies of Captains R
m, and declared that he had been swindled. The advance upon arriving near the ferry, was commanded by Col. Wyndham, of the First New-Jersey cavalry. Gen. Stahel directed a detail of dismounted carbineers to advance to the bank of river. Lieut. Sutherland, of the Second Pennsylvania cavalry, with a mixed detachment, numbering fifty, went forward and delivered the first fire. The enemy, concealed behind houses, fences, and trees, fired a few shots, but upon seeing a body of horsemen under Cay a temporary delay, but Capt. Heintz that night and the following day suffered severely from his mishap. Gen. Stahel, Capt. Theilkuhl, of his staff, Col. Wyndham, Capt. Middleton, of the Second Pennsylvania cavalry, Capts. Dugan, Crumb, Lieutenant Sutherland and other officers, whose names I do not know, shared the dangers encountered by the first detachment that crossed the river. The balance of the command followed as speedily as possible. The advance force, under Colonel Wyndham, as so
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.18 (search)
onstrance, and a high resolve. In the months following his return to England, alternating with indignant protests against misrepresentation, his Journal records many public and private hospitalities, and meetings with eminent and interesting people, on some of whom he makes shrewd and appreciative comment. One portraiture cannot be omitted,--his impressions of Queen Victoria. The first occasion on which he was received by Her Majesty was at Dunrobin Castle, when he visited the Duke of Sutherland, in company with Sir Henry Rawlinson, who did his best to make amends for his early doubts. Monday, 10th September, 1872. About noon, we had got ready for our reception by the Queen. Sir Henry had been careful in instructing me how to behave in the Presence, that I had to kneel and kiss hands, and, above all, I was not to talk, or write, about what I should see or hear. I almost laughed in his face when he charged me with the last, for I doubt whether the Queen's daughter would be l
New York Public Library, comprising the Astor, Lenox, and Tilden Foundations, which were consolidated. Brevet lieutenant-colonel A. A. Woodhull Brevet lieutenant-colonel J. J. Woodward Brevet major Charles R. Greenleaf Brevet lieutenant-colonel J. S. Billings probably have made them national figures in the military history of the United States. Some of the names on this medical roll of honor from the regular army are those of Finley, Hammond, Barnes, Crane, Murray, Moore, Sutherland, Baxter, Sternberg, and Forwood, all of them surgeons-general during or after the war. Others were Letterman, Smart, Woodward, Huntington, Otis, Woodhull, Smith, Greenleaf, and others whose great services might be mentioned. Many of these men became figures of national importance in a medical and surgical sense. Some in their time were recognized as the highest authorities the world over in respect to the professional subjects with which they had been particularly identified. Contrary
New York Public Library, comprising the Astor, Lenox, and Tilden Foundations, which were consolidated. Brevet lieutenant-colonel A. A. Woodhull Brevet lieutenant-colonel J. J. Woodward Brevet major Charles R. Greenleaf Brevet lieutenant-colonel J. S. Billings probably have made them national figures in the military history of the United States. Some of the names on this medical roll of honor from the regular army are those of Finley, Hammond, Barnes, Crane, Murray, Moore, Sutherland, Baxter, Sternberg, and Forwood, all of them surgeons-general during or after the war. Others were Letterman, Smart, Woodward, Huntington, Otis, Woodhull, Smith, Greenleaf, and others whose great services might be mentioned. Many of these men became figures of national importance in a medical and surgical sense. Some in their time were recognized as the highest authorities the world over in respect to the professional subjects with which they had been particularly identified. Contrary
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some reminiscences of the Second of April, 1865. (search)
We reached Danville, on the southern border of Virginia, late in the afternoon of the 3d. The telegraph had, of course, conveyed full intelligence to that little city, and our arrival was anticipated. Its hospitable and noble citizens met us at the depot with carriages and other vehicles of conveyance, and we were conveyed, not to public hotels, but to private residences of the generous citizens of Danville. The President, I remember, was provided for at the hospitable mansion of Major Sutherland. I had the singular good fortune to fall into the kind hands and home of Mr. Witcher Kean, who, and his most excellent wife, were as noble specimens of Virginia hospitality and large-heartedness as one could ever wish to meet. I can never forget those true-hearted people. Among my many companions under Mr. Kean's hospitable roof, I cannot refrain from mentioning one who belonged to my own profession. I mean the Hon. James D. Halyburton. He had been a United States District Judge fo
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Roster of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
26, mar.; laborer; Somerset Co. Md. 7 May 63; 29 May--Gen. Hos. Beaufort, S. C.; dis. Wounded 18 Jly 63 Ft. Wagner. $50. Smith, Samuel 30, sin.; laborer; Boston. 13 Feb 63; died 5 Jny 65 Morris Id. S. C of disease. $50. Spencer, Aaron Corpl 20, sill.; farmer; No. Lee. 18 Feb 63; died of wound 6 Sep 63 Morris Id. S. C. $50. Spriggs, Isaiah 19, sin.; laborer; Chelsea. 20 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Stevens, William A. 19, sin.; farmer; Gt. Barrington. 18 Feb 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Sutherland, John 30, sin.; farmer; Stockport, N. Y. 10 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Tabb, America C. 37, sin.; laborer; Boston. 13 Feb 63; 26 Oct 63 Morris Id. S. C.; dis. $50. Taylor, Robert L. Sergt 20, sin.; seaman; Boston. 4 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Taylor, William Thomas 18, sin.; farmer; Tyringham 18 Dec 63; 8 Je 65 Gen. Hos. Beaufort, S. C.; dis. $325. Thomas, Jacob H. 26, sin.; farmer; Gt. Barrington. 18 Feb 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Thompson, Charles P. 21, mar.; farmer; Gt. Barrington
to carry his inner line. General Sheridan being advised of the condition of affairs, returned General Miles to his proper command. On reaching the enemy's lines immediately surrounding Petersburg, a portion of General Gibbons' corps, by a most gallant charge, captured two strong, enclosed works — the most salient and commanding south of Petersburg — thus materially shortening the line of investment necessary for taking in the city. The enemy south of Hatcher's run retreated west-ward to Sutherland's station, where they were overtaken by Miles' division. A severe engagement ensued, and lasted until both his right and left flanks were threatened by the approach of General Sheridan, who was moving from Ford's station toward Petersburg, and a division sent by General Meade from the front of Petersburg, when he broke in the utmost confusion, leaving in our hands his guns and many prisoners. This force retreated by the main road along the Appomattox river. During the night of the secon
at one A. M., on the twenty-second of June, starting from the vicinity of Prince George Court-house. He crossed the Petersburg and Weldon railroad at Reams' station, at which point Colonel Chapman, with the Second brigade of Wilson's own division had a skirmish with a small force of the enemy, which, however, was easily driven. The expedition moved by way of Dinwiddie Court-house toward Petersburg and Lynchburg, on the south side of the railroad, which they struck at Ford's mills, near Sutherland's station. They then moved down the road, General Kautz in advance, as far as Ford's station, destroying the road as they moved. At Ford's station they captured two trains, comprising sixteen cars, with the locomotives, laden with refugees leaving Petersburg. After destroying the depot and captured trains, the command bivouacked at Ford's station for the night. Early on the morning of the twenty-third they resumed their march, General Kautz still in advance. Near Nottoway Court-hous
s, perceiving the enemy were moving to his right, pursued and overtook him at Sutherland's station, where a sharp engagement took place, Miles handling his single divnth corps immediately moved up the river, reaching that night the vicinity of Sutherland's station. The next three days, the third, fourth, and fifth, the pursuit ts of the enemy; to the brilliant attack of Miles' division, Second corps, at Sutherland's station; to the energetic pursuit and attack of the enemy by the Second cort zeal, pushing him across Hatcher's run, and following him up on the road to Sutherland's depot. On the north side of the run I overtook Miles, who was anxious to athis division, as I believe the enemy could at that time have been crushed at Sutherland's depot. I returned to Five Forks, and marched out the Ford road toward Hatcrd's depot, meeting no opposition, and the Fifth corps marched rapidly toward Sutherland's depot, in flank and rear of the enemy opposing Miles. As he approached tha
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