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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Edward Sweeney or search for Edward Sweeney in all documents.

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to be prisoners. Company F.--Killed--Privates James Flynn, James Nelson, Michael Dowling, Henry Hilliard, Wm. Mackay. Wounded--Capt. Hugh McQuaide, severely, taken prisoner. Privates John McIntire, Patrick McGann, Martin O'Neill, Thomas Murphy, Wm. Fielding. Missing--Sergeant Donahoe, Corporal Moloney, Privates Timothy Sullivan, Michael Kennedy, Joseph Sheppard, Patrick Coyle, Lawrence Mooney, John Holland. Company G.--Wounded--First Lieut. Thomas S. Hamblin, in the leg. Privates Edward Sweeney, Benjamin Taylor, (all taken prisoners,) Henry Lansing. Missing--Henry Hedge, Thomas H. Kerr, Patrick McGinn, William H. Millett, Charles J. Rydecker, George Wright, (all supposed to have been taken prisoners.) Company H.--Killed--Private John Orman. Wounded--Norton Schermerhorn, slightly; Luthur L. Mills, both arms shot off, (a prisoner;) Hugh F. Dunnigan, in leg, (a prisoner;) William Barker, in leg; John Robson, in neck; John Hallam, slightly in head; Robert F. Robertson
Doc. 133.-attack on Forsythe, Missouri, July 22, 1861. Springfield, Mo., Wednesday, July 24, 1861. Last Saturday 1,200 men were detailed, under Gen. Sweeney, to break up a secession camp located at Forsythe — a point about fifty miles south of this, and situated at or near the foot of the Ozark Mountains. Monday, at starting, we were thirty miles from Forsythe, having only made twenty miles in the two days previous, owing to heavy rains and the consequent almost impassable character of the mountain roads. However, the day was cool, and the men pushed forward with a vigor that brought them to their destination at 2 P. M. of the same day. Our command was composed of Companies C and D, Dragoons, under Capt. Stanley, a section of Capt. Totten's battery, under charge of Lieut. Sokalski, five hundred of the First Iowa regiment, under Lieut.-Col. Merritt, and a balance made up of mounted Kansas Volunteers, under Capt. Wood, and Second Kansas Infantry, under Col. Mitchell. F
ning dawned upon us with its fierce glare. General Lyon finding himself short of provisions, his men weary and footsore, many of them sick from intemperate use of water and green fruits, with a powerful enemy encamped in front, whom he could not chase by reason of the precautions against surprises and flank movements — moreover, a large force of the enemy in the direction of Sarcoxie, and the necessity of keeping open his communication with Springfield — called a consultation with Brigadier-Generals Sweeney, Siegel; Majors Schofield, Shepherd, Conant, Sturgis; Captains Totten and Shaeffer, when it was determined to retire toward Springfield. This conclusion seems to be well-founded when we reflect that the provisions for such an army must be transported from Rolla at great risk (of capture. Nothing could be found either for man or horse on the track of the rebels. Hardly had the decision been declared, when one of the cavalry scouts announced that he had witnessed the departure o
r, at which there was nearly an unanimous voice for evacuating Springfield. Gen. Sweeney pleaded eloquently against such a course, declared it would be the ruin of tthe direction of Kansas, while others regarded Rolla as the more desirable. Gen. Sweeney, however, pointed out the disastrous results which must ensue upon retreatin glare in his eyes he had about placed himself in the van of the Iowas while Gen. Sweeney took a similar position to lead on a portion of the Kansas troops, when the ulances, in one of which his body was placed to be conveyed to Springfield. Gen. Sweeney received a shot in his right leg, at the same fire, and limped back to the s points--Gen. Lyon on the west, Siegel on the south, Sturgis on the north, and Sweeney, I think, on the east. Our encampment was taken by surprise, but in hot hastely confirmed; Lyon is killed and Siegel in flight and believed to be captured; Sweeney is killed, and Southwestern Missouri cleared of the National scum of invaders.
age of us. He then called a council of war, at which there was nearly an unanimous voice for evacuating Springfield. Gen. Sweeney pleaded eloquently against such a course, declared it would be the ruin of the Union cause in that quarter of the Statch a movement. Some favored a retreat in the direction of Kansas, while others regarded Rolla as the more desirable. Gen. Sweeney, however, pointed out the disastrous results which must ensue upon retreating without a battle — how the enemy would b Come on, brave men, and with an unnatural glare in his eyes he had about placed himself in the van of the Iowas while Gen. Sweeney took a similar position to lead on a portion of the Kansas troops, when the enemy came only near enough to discharge tguard, and carried lifeless toward the ambulances, in one of which his body was placed to be conveyed to Springfield. Gen. Sweeney received a shot in his right leg, at the same fire, and limped back to the surgeon. The command now devolved upon M
een thousand men and eighteen pieces of artillery, having received large reinforcements within the last few days. The attack was made simultaneously at four different points--Gen. Lyon on the west, Siegel on the south, Sturgis on the north, and Sweeney, I think, on the east. Our encampment was taken by surprise, but in hot haste soon formed for battle. The forces engaged were about equal on each side, the Federals having the advantage in position and heavy artillery. The red harvest of deats Department. By order of Major-General Fremont. J. C. Kelton, Assistant Adjutant-General. A rebel shout of exultation. The victory in Missouri is gloriously confirmed; Lyon is killed and Siegel in flight and believed to be captured; Sweeney is killed, and Southwestern Missouri cleared of the National scum of invaders. All honor and gratitude to Ben. McCulloch and the gallant men with him, who met and scourged the minions of National tyranny. The brave sons of Louisiana were the