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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Swift or search for Swift in all documents.

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t this critical moment, Major-General Gordon Granger, who had been posted with his reserves to cover our left and rear, arrived upon the field. He knew nothing of the condition of the battle, but, with the true instincts of a soldier, he had marched to the sound of the cannon. General Thomas merely pointed out to him the gap through which the enemy was debouching, when, quick as thought, he threw upon it Steadman's brigade of cavalry. In the words of General Rosecrans's official report: Swift was the charge and terrible the conflict, but the enemy was broken. A thousand of our brave men, killed and wounded, paid for its possession, but we held the gap. Two of Longstreet's corps confronted the position: determined to take it, they successively came to the assault. A battery of six guns, which played into the gorge, poured death and slaughter into them. They charged to within a few yards of the pieces, but our grape and canister and the leaden hail of musketry, delivered in spar
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 87.-the campaign in Florida. (search)
nville to Sanderson. The President's amnesty proclamation will be extensively circulated through Florida. A large supply has just arrived from Washington, and packages have already been sent to the front. I doubt not we shall see a most favorable effect produced by its distribution. On Thursday the steamer Nelly Baker proceeded up St. John's River, a distance of thirty-five miles from Jacksonville, to a place called Green Cove Spring. Two companies of infantry were on board. Medical Director Swift was in command of the force. After landing, the party went to one of the principal hotels of the place, and discovered therein eighteen barrels of sugar and three barrels of resin, which was brought away in the vessel the same day. Three families of refugees, with their furniture, were also taken off. They had been expecting our forces would go there for some days. The location has been famous in its day as a watering-place. A large sulphur-spring is in the vicinity, around which