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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for O. H. Swift or search for O. H. Swift in all documents.

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resumed his occupation. Surgeon C. C. Keeney of Col. Hunter's division, and Assistant-Surgeon D. L. Magruder, attached to the commanding general's staff, did good service in the hospital church I have mentioned, and also in two houses near the church, where the wounded were placed after the church had been filled. These officers remained busily engaged in the discharge of their duties till the enemy's cavalry made their appearance, and but narrowly escaped capture, when they left. Drs. Swift and Winston, attached to the New York 8th regiment, remained with their sick sacrificing all selfish considerations for their own safety, in order that the wounded might not be neglected, and are now prisoners. I am informed that Assistant-Surgeons Grey and Steinburg of the Regular Army, and Drs. Honiston and Swan of the New York 14th, also preferred to remain rather than abandon their charge. The conduct of these officers is worthy of all commendation. It would be premature in me, in t
age, who had remained behind to take care of him. This man died under the operation. The next operation was that of my friend Wm. Smith, of Brooklyn, whom I had conveyed to the hospital. His foot was amputated. During this time Drs. Foster, Swift, and Winston, of the Eighth New York; Dr. De Grant, Dr. Griswold, Dr. Buxton, and the doctor of the Fourth Maine; Dr. Stewart, of Minnesota; Harris, of Rhode Island, and four others whose names I did not learn, one of whom, I believe, was the sur. Mead, of Massachusetts, a wealthy shoe-manufacturer, died while having his thigh amputated. Several others died, whose names I could not learn, numbering in all 32. On Tuesday evening, six of the doctors came back on parole — Drs. Peugnet, Swift, Winston, De Graw, Buxton, and Stewart — and immediately commenced attending to the wounded. Their exertions were unremitting; their time day and night was given to the wounded until all the wounds were properly dressed and all cared for. On
our regiment, have returned with me, and have been efficient and unwearied in the discharge of their duty. Below I inclose a list of the members of our regiment wounded and prisoners, now in the hands of the enemy at Richmond: wounded: Private O. H. Swift, Company A, fractured arm, doing well; Private Venables, Company B, fractured arm, doing well; Private Clune, Company G, fractured thigh, doing well; Private Denny, Company D, fleshwound of arm, well; Private Whitehouse,-----, flesh-wound d arm, doing well; Private Venables, Company B, fractured arm, doing well; Private Clune, Company G, fractured thigh, doing well; Private Denny, Company D, fleshwound of arm, well; Private Whitehouse,-----, flesh-wound of leg, well. prisoners: Captain Griffin, Company E; Color-sergeant,------; Private Pinto, Company B; Private Danielson, Company B; Private Greene, Company F; Private Simms, Company G; Private Bleny, Company E. Respectfully, foster Swift, Surgeon 8th Regiment, N. Y. S. M.