Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for William Swinton or search for William Swinton in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 5 document sections:

The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Morale of General Lee's army. (search)
scipline alone which made the Army of Northern Virginia what it was — which gave to it that heroic courage, that patience under hardships, that indomitable nerve under disaster, and that full confidence in its grand old chief, and in itself, that won, against fearful odds, a long series of splendid victories, and which, even in its defeat, wrung from Horace Greeley the tribute, The rebellion had failed, and gone down, but the rebel army of Virginia and its commander had not failed; and from Swinton, in his Army of the Potomac, the following graceful eulogy: Nor can there fail to arise the image of that other army, that was the adversary of the Army of the Potomac, and which who can ever forget that once looked upon it?-that array of tattered uniforms and bright muskets — that body of incomparable infantry, the Army of Northern Virginia, which, for four years, carried the revolt on its bayonets, opposing a constant front to the mighty concentration of power brought against it; which, r
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Meade at Gettysburg. (search)
Meade had yielded to his own inclination to attack, he would have been repulsed himself, and would thus have thrown away the fruits of his great victory. That this view is correct, is proved beyond all doubt by the following passage, from Mr. William Swinton's History of the army of the Potomac. Mr. Swinton says: I have become convinced, from the testimony of General Longstreet himself, that attack would have resulted disastrously. I had, said that officer to the writer, Hood and McLaws,Mr. Swinton says: I have become convinced, from the testimony of General Longstreet himself, that attack would have resulted disastrously. I had, said that officer to the writer, Hood and McLaws, who had not been engaged; I had a heavy force of artillery; I should have liked nothing better than to have been attacked, and have no doubt that I should have given those who tried as bad a reception as Pickett received. On July 4th, Lee, during a heavy storm, withdrew from our front, and on the 11th took up a position at Williamsport, on the Potomac. He was closely followed by Meade, who came up with him on the 12th, and who found him in a position naturally almost impregnable, and stro
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
ers to the fact that, on the 3d of July, General Gregg was engaged with the enemy on our extreme right, having passed across the Baltimore pike and Bonaughtown road and boldly attacked the enemy's left and rear, and in his dispatches of that date he telegraphed in the evening to Washington: My cavalry have been engaged all day on both flanks of the enemy, harassing and vigorously attacking him with great success, notwithstanding they encountered superior numbers, both cavalry and infantry. Swinton, in his Campaigns of the army of the Potomac, states that during the action (July 3d) the cavalry had been operating on the flanks-Kilpatrick's Division on the left, and Gregg's Division on the right, and, in a note, the scope of this work does not permit the recital of the details of the numerous cavalry affairs. And Bates, in his History of the battle of Gettysburg, which contains some good material, gives a few lines to an account of the operations on the right flank, correct in the mai
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Lee and Grant in the Wilderness. (search)
Division, of the Sixth Corps, took position on the plank road. The historian Swinton states this to have been at 8.20 A. M. Hill's two divisions were at least eighrd to halt before it was reached, Generals Grant and Meade had (according to Mr. Swinton) just reached the old Wilderness tavern, and each of these generals believed on the two roads, and throughout the two days collision, is taken mostly from Swinton's History of the army of the Potomac. General Lee's infantry was composed of hich soon enveloped its flank. The fighting was severe as long as it lasted. Swinton says of it, an hour's severe fighting. While the firing was severe on the f, Heth's Division took position on his right. An extract will be made from Swinton, as he is often quoted, and, as far as my information goes, is in general quitepulsed. It was about nine A. M. when the advance was resumed, according to Mr. Swinton, to meet a bitter opposition, and, although furious fighting took place, he
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The mistakes of Gettysburg. (search)
disagrees with it quite widely. The main point that he makes is to quote from Swinton's Army of the Potomac, the following paragraph (page 310): The number of infan of over seventy thousand, and thus have left no margin in the estimate that Mr. Swinton ascribes to me for the other arms of the service. If General Dawes had followed Swinton's narrative closely, he must have discovered that (page 365) he says: General Lee's aggregate force present for duty on the 31st of May, 1863, was sie 1st of July, he estimated his infantry at fifty-two thousand bayonets. If Mr. Swinton received any information from me on the subject, he received this, for it wach I shall refer in this connection. It is in regard to a statement made by Mr. Swinton. In his Ultimo Suspiro, he gives the history of a meeting which he says too officers on the 7th, I never attended, and, of course, did not join in the advice it gave to General Lee. Mr. Swinton has been clearly misinformed upon this point.