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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Meade at Gettysburg. (search)
at this time consisted of the First Corps, General Reynolds; Second, General Hancock; Third, General Sickles; Fifth, General Sykes (who succeeded General Meade); Sixth, General Sedgwick; Eleventh, General Howard, and Twelfth, General Slocum; the caa few men whom he had collected together. General Meade sent several staff officers to urge forward the column under General Sykes, which was coming up with all possible speed, and which fortunately soon arrived. General Sykes at once threw a strGeneral Sykes at once threw a strong force upon Round Top, and succeeded in holding it against the enemy's assaults, after a fearful struggle. In the meantime, the attack upon General Sickles was continued with great fury, and after a stubborn and gallant resistance, during whiright of the Fifth Corps, and pressed the enemy on the centre, but on the left they were outflanked and driven back. General Sykes at once ordered forward the Pennsylvania Reserves, who, led by General Crawford, made a gallant charge, and, after a
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The mistakes of Gettysburg. (search)
The Fifth Corps, most fortunately, arrived, and took position on the left of the Third. Major General Sykes, commanding, immediately sending a force to occupy Round Top Ridge, where a most furious atteries (which began the battle) I sent several staff officers to hurry up the column under General Sykes of the Fifth Corps, then on its way, and which I expected would have reached there at that time. The column advanced rapidly, reached the ground in a short time, and General Sykes was fortunately enabled, by throwing a strong force upon Round Top mountain, where a most desperate and bloodych toward the knob of ground now suddenly grown in importance. On to the Round Top! hailed Sykes to his men; On to the Round Top! echoed the glen. On to the Round Top! In my formers anxiety to hurry up additional troops after the battle had opened, and his congratulation that Sykes, by throwing forward a strong force, was enabled to drive us from it and secure it to the Federa