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amored that it was slow. The right wing, consisting of McCall's, Morell's, and Sykes's divisions, less than twenty-five thousand strong, was well posted on the leftal Fitz-John Porter's corps, consisting of Morell's division of volunteers, and Sykes's regulars, some five thousand strong, increased by Duryea's Zouaves, was poste the swamps of the Chickahominy. Morell was on his right, in the centre, and Gen. Sykes, commanding five thousand regulars and Duryea's Zouaves, held the extreme rigemy. The action immediately began with vigor on the extreme right, held by Gen. Sykes's division, composed of Gen. Warner's, Col. Buchanan's and Col. Chapman's briwith greater ferocity than ever, to be again repulsed with terrible slaughter. Sykes's regulars, and Warren's brigade, in which are the Duryea Zouaves and Bendix's d near the bridge, were now moved two miles beyond. Keyes's corps was forward, Sykes was guarding our flanks, Morell was moving behind Keyes, Fitz-John Porter stood
ction, he requested permission to halt at Bristow and rest his men. Sykes's division, of Porter's corps, had spent the whole day of the twent P. M. Major-General McDowell, Warrenton: Fitz-John Porter, with Sykes's and Morell's divisions, will be within two miles and a half of Wa rear. Col. Schimmelfennig, however, went forward, and finding Generals Sykes and Reno near the place which had been indicated to him, formed on the right of Gen. Sykes, ready to take part in the action whenever it should become advisable. The brigades of Colonels Krzyzanowski and g entirely from their position. This was immediately reported to Gen. Sykes, who directed me to occupy the same ground with my skirmishers, wnce the rebel flank and destroying his line of retreat. Porter and Sykes were held in reserve. It is obvious that the complete success of aicers of his staff rides away to the left in Burnside's direction. Sykes meets them on the road — a good soldier, whose opinion is worth tak
on had evacuated Manassas Junction, he requested permission to halt at Bristow and rest his men. Sykes's division, of Porter's corps, had spent the whole day of the twenty-seventh, from ten o'clock i Junction, August 26, 1862, 8 P. M. Major-General McDowell, Warrenton: Fitz-John Porter, with Sykes's and Morell's divisions, will be within two miles and a half of Warrenton, on the Fayetteville gone further to the left and rear. Col. Schimmelfennig, however, went forward, and finding Generals Sykes and Reno near the place which had been indicated to him, formed on the right of Gen. Sykes, Gen. Sykes, ready to take part in the action whenever it should become advisable. The brigades of Colonels Krzyzanowski and Koltes had suffered so severely that I deemed it best to send them to the rear in reser which ended in their retiring entirely from their position. This was immediately reported to Gen. Sykes, who directed me to occupy the same ground with my skirmishers, which was accordingly done. T
s infantry supports in the hollows. On the left, Burnside was to carry the bridge already referred to, advancing then by a road which enters the pike at Sharpsburgh, turning at once the rebel flank and destroying his line of retreat. Porter and Sykes were held in reserve. It is obvious that the complete success of a plan contemplating widely divergent movements of separate corps, must largely depend on accurate timing — that the attacks should be simultaneous and not successive. Hooker moght is passing through the minds of both generals. They are the only reserves of the army; they cannot be spared. McClellan remounts his horse, and with Porter and a dozen officers of his staff rides away to the left in Burnside's direction. Sykes meets them on the road — a good soldier, whose opinion is worth taking. The three Generals talk briefly together. It is easy to see that the moment has come when every thing may turn on one order given or withheld, when the history of the battl
s soon as the Eighteenth Massachusetts had crossed the ford it was drawn up in order, on the road running below the bluffs toward Shepherdstown, under command of Major Hayes. At this moment, and before the other regiments had crossed, Brigadier-General Sykes, who had previously crossed the river, and whose command consisted, as I was informed, of about eight hundred men, then in advance toward the west, came to me with the information that the enemy were in strong force about two miles in hing forces it was difficult for them to avoid some damage to our own troops. Some of their shot and shell struck in our rear, and some of the casualties of the day may be attributed to that source. It was soon perceived that the command of General Sykes, on our left, was retiring, and they had marched nearly to the foot of the hill, when I received orders to retire in good order, and to recross the river. I immediately gave the necessary orders to fall back, to the regiments posted, as abov