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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for E. T. Sykes or search for E. T. Sykes in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ot yet ascertained, but in killed and wounded it is known to be very small. In stragglers and prisoners, I fear it is much larger. The Chief of Artillery reports the loss of forty pieces. I am, Sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Braxton Bragg, General Commanding. Note.—As a matter of justice to General Anderson's Division, charged in the above report as breaking at Missionary Ridge, we append the following extract from an autograph letter of General Bragg to Major E. T. Sykes, of Columbus, Mississippi, dated Mobile, 8th of February, 1873: * * * * I have always believed our disaster at Missionary Ridge was due immediately to the misconduct of a brigade of Buckner's troops from East Tennessee, commanded by Brigadier-General Alex. W. Reynolds, which first gave way, and could not be rallied. Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. By Colonel J. B. Walton, Captain J. A. Chalaron, Colonel B. F. Eschelman, and Colonel W. M. Owen. [At the reuni
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. (search)
andsomely checked by Major-General Cleburne and Brigadier-General Gist, in command of their respective divisions, that he gave us but little annoyance. Our losses are not yet ascertained, but in killed and wounded it is known to be very small. In stragglers and prisoners, I fear it is much larger. The Chief of Artillery reports the loss of forty pieces. I am, Sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Braxton Bragg, General Commanding. Note.—As a matter of justice to General Anderson's Division, charged in the above report as breaking at Missionary Ridge, we append the following extract from an autograph letter of General Bragg to Major E. T. Sykes, of Columbus, Mississippi, dated Mobile, 8th of February, 1873: * * * * I have always believed our disaster at Missionary Ridge was due immediately to the misconduct of a brigade of Buckner's troops from East Tennessee, commanded by Brigadier-General Alex. W. Reynolds, which first gave way, and could not be rallied
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 50 (search)
A Cursory sketch of General Bragg's campaigns. Paper no. 1. By Major E. T. Sykes, of Columbus, Miss. [The following sketches were writen by Major Sykes in January, 1873, and are now given just as they were originally prepared, with a few notes added. It is scarcely necessary to say that we publish without comment of our own, and without expressing any opinion as to certain controverted points.] Although remotely removed from the exciting events which transpired during the four years Major Sykes in January, 1873, and are now given just as they were originally prepared, with a few notes added. It is scarcely necessary to say that we publish without comment of our own, and without expressing any opinion as to certain controverted points.] Although remotely removed from the exciting events which transpired during the four years of War between the States, and reason has had time to coolly weigh with the accuracy of justice the motives and conduct of those superiors, who were at the helm of State, or generalship in the field, how few there are who have given thought sufficient to the real issues, its magnitude and surrounding, or sufficiently studied the military genius in more than one way displayed by our commanding Generals to meet the ever varying emergencies, to correctly estimate their respective merits. The caus
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 72 (search)
A Cursory sketch of General Bragg's campaigns. Paper no. 2. By Major E. T. Sykes, of Columbus, Miss. The Kentucky campaign. By the 21st of August, having made all needful preparations and inured his troops to the necessary and required discipline, General Bragg, with Hardee and Polk's corps, crossed the Tennessee river at Harrison's Ferry, nine miles above Chattanooga (we had but one transport, and consequently were several days crossing, which allowed the boys in gray an opportunity of bathing, the last they enjoyed until we captured Mumfordsville, on the Green river), and moving over Waldem's Ridge (it should, in respect and deference to its size, have been more properly called High and Broad mountain) and Cumberland mountain, turned Buell's left; and on the 5th of September the Confederate column was greeted with a large sign board, nailed by our advance pioneer corps to a tree on the side of the road, with these words appearing on it in bold relief: You now cross from Te
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
A Cursory sketch of General Bragg's campaigns. Paper no. 3. By Major E. T. Sykes, of Columbus, Mississippi. Retreat from Murfreesboro. On the 4th day of January, 1863, the Confederate army fell back and took up winter quarters at Shelbyville and Tullahoma. While there General Joe Johnston was sent out by the Department to investigate and report upon the operations and discipline of the army. He found both satisfactory, and so reported. Retreat out of town. In June following, to counteract a flank movement on the part of Rosecrans, Bragg commenced a retreat to and across the Tennessee to Chattanooga. The Federal commander, Rosecrans, and H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief, had been in correspondence for some time prior, the latter urging the former to advance and attack Bragg, the former holding back and assigning, for reason, the impropriety of risking two great and decisive battles at the same time, besides his general officers, including corps and division commanders