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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first fight of iron-clads. (search)
te, Marmaduke, Littlepage, Craig, Long, and Rootes; Paymaster, James Semple; Surgeon, Dinwiddie Phillips; Assistant-Surgeon, Algernon S. Garnett; Captain of Marines, Reuben Thorn; Engineers, H. A. Ramsey, acting chief; Assistants, Tynan, Campbell, Herring, Jack, and White; Boatswain, Hasker; Gunner, Oliver; Carpenter, Lindsey; Clerk, Arthur Sinclair, Jr.; Volunteer Aides, Lieutenant Douglas Forrest, C. S. A., Captain Kevil, commanding detachment of Norfolk United Artillery; Signal Corps, Sergeant Tabb. Every one had flocked to the army, and to it we had to look for a crew. Some few seamen were found in Norfolk, who had escaped from the gun-boat flotilla in the waters of North Carolina, on their occupation by Admiral Goldsborough and General Burnside. In hopes of securing some men from the army, I was sent to the headquarters of General Magruder at Yorktown, who was known to have under his command two battalions from New Orleans, among whom might be found a number of seamen. The
eady stated. On the point they have thrown up an earthwork, and procured two howitzers for its defence. They have also brought a number of old canal boats down from Richmond, and sunk them across the entrance to Warwick River, a stream one mile in width at its mouth. The Tenth Georgia camp adjoins that of the Second Louisiana, being further up the shore of Warwick River. Adjoining these, and still further up, is the Tenth Louisiana. Beyond these, and one mile distant from the river, at Tabb's fields, (near Warwick Court House,) is the Second Florida. The Fifteenth Virginia command the road leading from Newport News to Richmond, and have thrown earthworks across it at a point about five miles above the News. They have also ditched it, and erected an eightgun battery, already alluded to. Of the guns two are brass field-pieces and one a rifled cannon. A squadron of five hundred cavalry is stationed with this regiment, and used for scouting purposes. The Sixth Georgia regiment i
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Roster of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
; dis. Wounded 18 Jly 63 Ft. Wagner. $50. Smith, Samuel 30, sin.; laborer; Boston. 13 Feb 63; died 5 Jny 65 Morris Id. S. C of disease. $50. Spencer, Aaron Corpl 20, sill.; farmer; No. Lee. 18 Feb 63; died of wound 6 Sep 63 Morris Id. S. C. $50. Spriggs, Isaiah 19, sin.; laborer; Chelsea. 20 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Stevens, William A. 19, sin.; farmer; Gt. Barrington. 18 Feb 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Sutherland, John 30, sin.; farmer; Stockport, N. Y. 10 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Tabb, America C. 37, sin.; laborer; Boston. 13 Feb 63; 26 Oct 63 Morris Id. S. C.; dis. $50. Taylor, Robert L. Sergt 20, sin.; seaman; Boston. 4 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Taylor, William Thomas 18, sin.; farmer; Tyringham 18 Dec 63; 8 Je 65 Gen. Hos. Beaufort, S. C.; dis. $325. Thomas, Jacob H. 26, sin.; farmer; Gt. Barrington. 18 Feb 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Thompson, Charles P. 21, mar.; farmer; Gt. Barrington. 26 Feb 63; 4 Oct 65 New York. $50. Townsend, Ralsey R. 35, mar.; teamster;
from the place, with the loss of over twenty killed and an unknown number wounded. Forty prisoners were taken here. Immense quantities of supplies of every description were destroyed at this place, and the buildings composing the station, together with a large water-tank, were consumed by fire. In the meantime General Kautz with Mix's brigade, had moved down to White bridge, where the railroad crosses the Nottoway, about six miles from Stony creek. Here three thousand rebels, under Colonel Tabb, of the Fifty-ninth Virginia, were found intrenched in a fort commanding the bridge. The rebel skirmishers extended for a mile along the railroad, and were soon engaged in a sharp conflict with the carbineers of the Third New York, under Major Jacobs. The First District Columbia, under Major Baker, entered the woods on the extreme left, and succeeded in turning the enemy's position. This regiment is armed with the sixteen shooters, and the accuracy and rapidity of their firing soon thr
F., major; Gordon, William W., colonel; Grigsby, Andrew J., major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Haynes, Charles L., lieutenant-colonel; Paxton, Elisha F., major; Shriver, Daniel M., major, lieutenant-colonel. Twenty-eighth Artillery battalion: Tabb, William B., major. Twenty-eighth Infantry regiment: Allen, Robert C., major, colonel; Paul, Samuel B., lieutenant-colonel; Preston, Robert T., colonel; Spessard, Michael P., major; Watts, William, major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Wingfield, H., lieutenantcol-onel, colonel; Walker, Edward T., major. Fifty-ninth Infantry regiment: Anderson, Frank P., lieutenant-colonel; Henningsen, Charles F., colonel; Jones, Joseph, lieutenant-colonel; Lawson, John, major; Mosby, Robert G., major; Tabb, William B., colonel. Fifty-ninth Militia regiment: Copeland, John R., colonel. Sixtieth Infantry regiment: Corley, James L., lieutenant-colonel; Gilliam, William A., lieutenant-colonel; Hammond, George W., major, lieutenant-colonel; Jones,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
n composed of the Stono scouts, the Rebel troop, the Cadets and Sullivan's cavalry company, one section of the Marion artillery, and Captain Jennett's company of the Fifty-ninth Virginia infantry, he held the whole force of the enemy in check; fought and fell back some two or three miles only, and in turn drove them back nearly the whole distance by such repeated charges all day that he made them fear he was supported, and he held his ground manfully until night, when he was reinforced by Colonel Tabb with a battalion of the Fifty-ninth Virginia and the Marion artillery. On the morning of the 10th, Jenkins was reinforced by Charles' South Carolina battery and a battalion of the Twenty-sixth Virginia, under Col. P. R. Page, who took command until General Wise came up and retired the forces to a more advantageous position, across the Bohicket road. Part of Colquitt's Georgia brigade soon arrived, and a strong line was formed. The enemy's advance was met by the artillery, before who
oking the town. Lieutenant McEaddy was sent to ascertain the true position of the enemy's pickets, and a secret night expedition was planned to capture the post, which proved successful, the entire guard of 8 men being captured. Subsequently Colonel Tabb, now in command at Waldo, ordered Captain Dickison to make a reconnoissance. this was done and the enemy opened fire on our advance guard. The firing soon became general; the enemy sent forward two regiments, one white and one colored, which, with a loss of 11 killed and 22 captured. Our troops then retired in good order without any loss, though the enemy outnumbered them eight to one. On April 22d, in conveying notice of his relief by Col. J. M. Martin, Sixth Florida battalion, Colonel Tabb expressed to Captain Dickison the high appreciation in which you and your command are held. The faithfulness, promptness and superior judgment which you have at all times manifested, give assurance of those soldierly qualities which inspire
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
en—Foute, Marmaduke, Littlepage, Craig, Long, and Roots. Paymaster—James Semple. Surgeon—Dinwiddie Phillips. Assistant-Surgeon—Algernon S. Garnett. Captain of Marines—Reuben Thom. Engineers—H. A. Ramsey, Acting Chief; Assistants—Tynan, Campbell, Herring, Jack and White. Boatswain—Hasker. Gunner—Oliver. Carpenter—Lindsey. Clerk —Arthur Sinclair, Jr. Volunteer Aide—Lieutenant Douglas Forrest, C. S. A.; Captain Kevil, commanding detatchment of Norfolk United Artillery. Signal Corps—Sergeant Tabb. Campaign against Steele in April, 1864. Report of General Marmaduke. headquarters Marmaduke's division, in the field, May 28th, 1864. Colonel,—In obedience to orders from the Major-General commanding, I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of my command in the campaign against the Federal forces under Major-General Steele, which was ended on the 30th ult. by their retreat across the Saline, and to their base, Little Rock.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). (search)
to the attacks of the enemy. . . . . The only alternative, in the opinion of the court, was to abandon and burn the ship then and there, which, in the judgment of the court, was deliberately and wisely done. List of officers of the C. S. Iron-clad Virginia, March 8th, 1862. Flag-Officer—Franklin Buchanan. Lieutenants—Catesby Ap R. Jones, Executive and Ordnance officer; Charles C. Simms, R. D. Minor (flag), Hunter Davidson, J. Taylor Wood, J. R. Eggleston, Walter Butt. Midshipmen—Foute, Marmaduke, Littlepage, Craig, Long, and Roots. Paymaster—James Semple. Surgeon—Dinwiddie Phillips. Assistant-Surgeon—Algernon S. Garnett. Captain of Marines—Reuben Thom. Engineers—H. A. Ramsey, Acting Chief; Assistants—Tynan, Campbell, Herring, Jack and White. Boatswain—Hasker. Gunner—Oliver. Carpenter—Lindsey. Clerk —Arthur Sinclair, Jr. Volunteer Aide—Lieutenant Douglas Forrest, C. S. A.; Captain Kevil, commanding detatchment of Norfolk United Artillery. Signal Corps—
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations around Petersburg-General Hagood's report of 16th, 17th and 18th of June, 1864. (search)
ntry. With the aid of a map opportunely sent me by Colonel Harris, Chief of Engineers, I finally determined upon the line of the creek, which empties into the Appomattox in rear of No. 1, and the west fork of which crosses the lines near No. 15, and established my command upon it. General Colquitt's brigade and the other brigades arriving shortly afterwards were established upon this line, General Hoke having approved the selection, and by daylight the position was partially entrenched. Colonel Tabb's regiment of Wise's brigade held the lines from No. 1 to No. 2, and was relieved by one of my regiments (Twenty-seventh South Carolina). This made my line en echellon, with the echelon thrown forward on the left. Discovering this fact at daylight, and that this portion of the line was completely enfiladed by the guns of the enemy established at No. 7, I withdrew this regiment also to the west side of the creek. The new line now held by our forces was the chord of the arc of the abando
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