hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 8 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Tacitus or search for Tacitus in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Federal Union, the John Fiske (search)
and, as Mr. Freeman says, it is difficult to believe that the Roman century did not at the outset in some way correspond to the Teutonic hundred as a stage in political organization. But both these terms, as we know them in history, are survivals from some prehistoric state of things; and whether they were originally applied to a hundred of houses, or of families, or of warriors, we do not know. Freeman, Comparative politics, 118. M. Geffroy, in his interesting essay on the Germania of Tacitus, suggests that the term canton may have a similar origin. Geffroy, Rome et les Barbares, 209. The outlines of these primitive groups are, however, more obscure than those of the more primitive mark, because in most cases they have been either crossed and effaced or at any rate diminished in importance by the more highly compounded groups which came next in order of formation. Next above the hundred, in order of composition, comes the group known in ancient Italy as the pagus, in Attica
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hopkins, Stephen 1707-1785 (search)
a trial and his goods acquitted. If the judge can be prevailed upon (which it is very well known may too easily be done) to certify there was only probable cause for making the seizure, the unhappy owner may not maintain any action against the illegal seizure for damages, or obtain any satisfaction; but he may return to Georgia quite ruined and undone, in conformity to an act of Parliament. Such unbounded encouragement and protection given to informers must call to every one's remembrance Tacitus's account of the miserable condition of the Romans in the reign of Tiberius, their emperor, who let loose and encouraged the informers of that age. Surely, if the colonies had been fully heard before this had been done, the liberties of the Americans would not have been so much disregarded. The resolution that the House of Commons came into during the same session of Parliament, asserting their right to establish stamp duties and internal taxes, to be collected in the colonies without
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sumner, Charles 1811- (search)
British poets, and Harvey's Shakespeare. The last two were kept through life on his desk or table, ready for use. The Shakespeare was found open on the day of his death, as he had left it, with his mark between the leaves at the third part of Henry VI., pp. 446, 447, and his pencil had noted the passage: Would I were dead! if God's good — will were so; For what is in this world, but grief and woe? He spent the first year after leaving college in study, reading, among other things, Tacitus, Juvenal, Persius, Shakespeare, and Milton, Burton's Anatomy, Wakefield's Correspondence with Fox, Moore's Life of Byron, Butler's Reminiscences, Hume's Essays, Hallam, Robertson, and Roscoe, and making a new attempt at the mathematics. He then, rather reluctantly, chose the law as his pursuit in life. No trace can be found in his biography of any inclination towards the practice of the legal profession, or of much respect or capacity for the logic of the common law. We do not remember