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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Samuel L. Taggart or search for Samuel L. Taggart in all documents.

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this point till every thing is passed, and will then follow on to Johnson, carefully guarding all roads leading South. By order of Major-General O. O. Howard. S. L. Taggart, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. The above order was literally conformed to, excepting that a portion of General Corse's division bore to the righsistance. He always accompanied one or the other of the columns en route, and used every exertion to have my orders carried out to the letter and spirit. Captain S. L. Taggart, Assistant Adjutant-General, aided by Captain W. Bedford, were never too weary to issue clear and distinct orders after the day's march, and otherwise consthe campaigns of Atlanta and Savannah, and previous campaigns with the armies of the Potomac and Cumberland. For Major and Assistant Adjutant-General: Captain Samuel L. Taggart, Assistant Adjutant-General, for faithfulness and efficiency as an Assistant Adjutant-General. Major-General Slocum's Report. headquarters left w
and the assistance they rendered me in the operations near Savannah. I wish to bring before the Commander-in-Chief the names of my staff, who so materially gave me assistance during the campaign. Lieutenant-Colonel William E. Strong, Assistant Inspector-General and Chief of Staff, ever afforded me the most cheerful and ready assistance. He always accompanied one or the other of the columns en route, and used every exertion to have my orders carried out to the letter and spirit. Captain S. L. Taggart, Assistant Adjutant-General, aided by Captain W. Bedford, were never too weary to issue clear and distinct orders after the day's march, and otherwise constantly afforded me aid in bearing despatches. Captain C. B. Reese, Chief-Engineer, with the assistance of Lieutenant Stickney, have always received my warm commendations for their untiring activity, both in engineering and topograhical duty. He collated information with regard to different roads, furnished me good maps, when ne
, we could discover, from our picket post on the hills, that the enemy was retreating, and our friends pursuing them down the opposite bank of the Chickahominy. As soon as the enemy had cleared our front, I sent two companies (Captains Wood and Taggart) down to the river to communicate, if possible, with General Gregg. They there found Captain Harry Hammond, of the General's staff, who, not being able to get his horse across the river, came on foot to the regiment, delivered an order for us tand slept there, surrounded by the dead and dying. I grieve to state that the list of killed and wounded in this battle is large. Lieutenant Plunket, company H, was shot twice, and gloriously died on the field. Major Carter, Captains Brown, Taggart, and Croft, Lieutenants Brunson, O. W. Allen, Stephens, McCarley, Darrah, and Carter, were wounded; besides many others killed and wounded — a list of whom is hereto attached. Some have since died. The whole regiment acted in the most satisfac