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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
re a brief sketch of each of the above-named commands not previously described. At the organization of the Fourteenth regiment of Georgia volunteers, the officers were: Col. A. V. Brumby; Lieut.-Col. Robert W. Folsom; Maj. W. A. Harris; Adjt. A. Taliaferro; Quartermaster E. A. Heggis, and Commissary T. C. Moore. The captains were J. H. Etheridge (A), C. C. Kelly (B), L. A. Lane (C), James M. Fielder (D), H. P. Lester (E), R. P. Harman (F), T. T. Mounger (G), Thomas M. Yopp (H), R. W. McMichsuccessor was R. P. Lester. The lieutenant-colonels after Folsom were W. A. Harris, James M. Fielder, R. P. Lester and W. L. Goldsmith. Maj. W. A. Harris was followed by James M. Fielder, R. P. Lester, W. L. Goldsmith and C. C. Kelly; Adjt. A. Taliaferro by T. C. Moore. Captain Etheridge, (killed) was succeeded by J. W. Mayes; Kelly by B. W. Ryle; Lester by S. B. David and R. N. Rogers; Harmon (killed) by W. O. Clegg and J. H. Hicks; Yopp (retired) by H. B. Smith; McMichael was killed in acti
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
s had occupied that place, retraced his steps almost to his abandoned camp, and leaving the pike at Leadsville turned off upon an almost impassable road over Cheat mountain into the valley of the Cheat river, following the stream northward toward St. George in the forlorn hope of turning the mountains at the north end of the ridges and then regaining his communications. On the 13th the pursuing Federals overtook the Confederates between Kaler's and Carrick's fords. The First Georgia and Taliaferro's Twenty-third Virginia, with a section of artillery under Lieutenant Lanier and a cavalry force under Captain Smith, constituted the rear guard. The Georgians were ordered to hold the enemy in check until the wagon train had passed, and then retire behind the Virginians, who were to defend the train until the Georgians had formed in a new position. This system of retiring upon positions suited for defense was pursued without loss until Carrick's ford was reached, where the Twenty-third
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
Chapter 8: Cedar (Slaughter's) mountain, Second Manassas, South mountain, Harper's Ferry, Sharpsburg. Fredericksburg. Stonewall Jackson, in the Second Manassas campaign, had under his command the divisions of Taliaferro (Jackson's), A. P. Hill and Ewell. Col. E. L. Thomas, promoted to brigadier-general, commanded J. R. Anderson's brigade of Hill's division. Archer's brigade still contained the Nineteenth regiment. Lawton's brigade began here its long and distinguished identification with Ewell's division, later commanded by Lawton, Early, Gordon, and Evans. The Twelfth and Twenty-first regiments were in Trimble's brigade. The latter was the first in the fight at Slaughter's or Cedar mountain, August 9th, and the Twelfth was also particularly conspicuous. Posted by General Early, it held unwaveringly the key to the Confederate position on the hills after other parts of the line had broken, with the exception of Thomas' Georgians, who also stood fast on the right.