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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 40 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 11 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 17 5 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 13 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 10 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Taliaferro or search for Taliaferro in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
on, who had been up the whole of the previous night directing the movement of his troops, was asleep in a fence corner, when mounted scouts came in to inform us that a large body of Pope's army was moving past on the Warrenton road and in the direction of Centreville. As soon as he was waked and informed of the state of affairs, Gen. Jackson sprang up and moved rapidly towards his horse, buckling on his sword as he moved and urging the greatest speed on all around him, directing Ewell and Taliaferro to attack the enemy, which proved to be King's Division. With about 20,000 men he attacked Pope's army of 77,000 soldiers, so determined was he that Pope should not escape to Centreville, there to intrench and wait for the reinforcements of McClellan then on their way to him. The attack that evening brought on the bloody battle of Groveton. I must recur to the battle of Sharpsburg, as that was one of the sternest trials to which Jackson was ever subjected. 80,000 Federal soldiers unde
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
nkment, moving obliquely to the left until I had reached the large field again in which the enemy were found. Finding nothing to do, unless it was to attack an overwhelming force of the enemy, supported very strongly by artillery, I withdrew, after receiving heavy fire of grape and shell. Getting back to the railroad cut about the point I had reached the evening before, I received orders to march in conjunction with other troops, particularly those of General Archer, Colonels Thomas and Taliaferro. We all advanced together, taking the enemy, as it were, in e'chclon. We advanced steadily, driving the enemy from the field through the woods. While advancing through the woods we were exposed to a very heavy enfilade fire from the right. We continued our advance until after dark, when we came in contact with a body of the enemy. Each fired a volley. They ran and we rested for the night. Thus ended the Manassas fight with me. The brigade, with the exception of a few skulkers, behave
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
Walker, George B. Walker, P. F. Weaver. The roll of this company, with a brief history appended, has recently been sent in to the Adjutant-General's office for preservation as State records. From this record the following is copied: The above Company H, 13th Virginia Cavalry, was originally organized in January, 1861, as The Sussex Light Dragoons, Captain Belshes commanding, at Waverly, Sussex county, Va. The services of this company were tendered by one of its officers to Major-General Taliaferro, of the Virginia militia, April 19, 1861, he having just taken charge at Norfolk. On April 21st the company marched to Suffolk, and was there (April 22d) mustered into the State service for twelve months by Brigadier-General Shands, of the Virginia militia, and reported for duty the same day at Norfolk. At the expiration of its term of enlistment (twelve months) the company was reorganized for the war with largely increased numbers- W. N. Blow, Captain—at Currituck Courthouse, N.