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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 3: a cavalry officer of the army of the United States. (search)
here until after the 16th. To-morrow will probably see the last of Captain Brown (Old John Brown). There will be less interest for the others, but still I think the troops will not be withdrawn till they are similarly disposed of. This morning I was introduced to Mrs. Brown, who with a Mr. Tyndale and Mrs. McKim, all from Philadelphia, has come on to have a last interview with her husband. As it is a matter over which I have no control, and wish to take none, I referred them to General William B. Taliaferro. Commanding the Virginia troops. Tell Smith [his brother in the navy] that no charming women have insisted on taking charge of me, as they are always doing of him. I am left to my own resources. A committee of Congress was appointed to investigate the matter, who reported that the invasion was an act of lawless ruffians under the sanction of no public or political authority, distinguished from ordinary violence only by the ulterior ends in contemplation by them and by the f
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 6: the campaign in West Virginia. (search)
growth of timothy. This is a magnificent grazing country, and all it wants is labor to clear the mountainsides of timber. It has rained, I believe, some portion of every day since I left Staunton. Now it is pouring. Colonel Washington, Captain Taliaferro, and myself are in one tent, which as yet protects us. I have enjoyed the company of our son while I have been here. He is very well and very active, and as yet the war has not reduced him much. He dined with me yesterday and preserves hion the enemy's position could be assailed with success with troops which could be guided to the point they had reached. General Lee decided to make the attack, and gave to Rust a column of twelve hundred infantry, with such capable officers as Taliaferro and Fulkerson. General Jackson was to advance via the turnpike to confront the enemy from that direction, while another column, under Brigadier-General Anderson, was to advance to the third or west top of Cheat Mountain, where they could secur
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 9: Second battle of Manassas. (search)
later was increased to seventy thousand by the arrival of the corps of Fitz John Porter and Heintzelman. Lee proposed to hold the line of the Rappahannock and occupy Pope's attention with thirty thousand troops under the immediate command of Longstreet, while he rapidly transferred Jackson by a circuitous march of fifty-six miles to a point twentyfour miles exactly in rear of Pope's line of battle. On August 25th Jackson, with three divisions of infantry, under Ewell, A. P. Hill, and W. B. Taliaferro, preceded by Munford's Second Virginia Cavalry, crossed the upper Rappahannock, there called the Hedgman River, at Hinson Mills, four miles above Waterloo Bridge, where the left and right of the two opposing armies respectively rested. The Foot cavalry were in light marching order, and were accompanied only by a limited ordnance train and a few ambulances. Three days cooked rations were issued and duly deposited in haversacks, much of which was thrown away in the first few hours' marc
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
ere held by a part of the reserve artillery. Colonel E. P. Alexander was in charge of the division batteries of Anderson, Ransom, and McLaws. A. P. Hill, of Jackson's corps, was posted between Hood's right and Hamilton's Crossing. Early's and Taliaferro's divisions composed Jackson's second line, while D. H. Hill's division was formed in reserve. Stuart, with two brigades of cavalry, under General Lee's son and nephew, was on Jackson's right. A dense fog overhung the plain and river until af --exclusive of thirty-five hundred cavalry, under the gallant Bayard, as a reserve. The Federal advance marched to destruction. Meade broke through a gap in Jackson's line between Thomas's and Archer's brigade, but fresh troops came up under Taliaferro and Early, amid cries of Here comes old Jubal! Let Jubal straighten that fence! and it was securely rebuilt. The Union troops were broken and driven back with great slaughter. Meade lost in killed, wounded, and missing, 1,853, and Gibbon
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
Stuart, General J. E. B., mentioned, 54, 76, 163, 165, 182, 184, 187, 193, 205, 215, 222, 228, 244, 253, 254, 262, 263, 265, 285, 315; notice of, 152; Pennsylvania raid, 220; at Gettysburg, 298, 299; killed at Yellow Tavern, 337; described, 337. Stuart, the house of, 3. Sumner, General Edwin V., mentioned, 54, 57, 140, 147, 194, 222, 223, 226, 229. Suwanee University, Tennessee, 404. Sword of General Lee, 394. Sykes, General, mentioned, 283. Tabernacle Church, 246. Taliaferro, General, 76, 186, 190, 191- 228. Taney, Chief Justice, 82. Tayloe, Colonel G. E., 390. Taylor, Colonel, W. H., 150, 166, 126, 271, 301. Taylor, Zachary, 32, 33, 54. Terry, General, 24. Texan troops in the Wilderness, 331. Thomas, General George H., notice of, 47; mentioned, 61, 62, 58, 60, 103. Thomas, G. H., Mrs., mentioned, 67,69. Thomas, General, Lorenzo, 115. Thoroughfare Gap, 189, 190, 192, 193. Todd's Tavern, Va., 244. Toombs, General, Robert, 213, 214. Torbert's