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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 6: contraband of War, Big Bethel and Hatteras. (search)
m Camp Hamilton, with a suitable number of commissioned officers, and one company (B) of the Second Artillery from Fortress Munroe. They will be provided with ten days rations and water, and one hundred and forty rounds of ammunition. General Butler will report, as soon as he has his troops prepared, to Flag-Officer Stringham, and he will be ready to embark at one o'clock to-morrow. As soon as the object of the expedition is attained the detachment will return to Fortress Monroe. Captain Tallmadge, chief quartermaster, will provide a detachment of eight hundred and sixty men for the expedition to Hatteras Inlet, with a suitable quantity of water for ten days consumption, and the chief commissary of subsistence, Captain Taylor, will provide it with rations for the same length of time. These officers will report the execution of these orders by ten o'clock to-morrow if possible. By command of Major-General Wool: C. C. Churchill, First Lieutenant, Third Artillery, Act. Asst. A
Doc. 246 1/2.-the home Guard of New York city. At a meeting of the committee of the Home Guard, held April 26--Present, A. M. Bininger, in the chair. Judge Edmonds, Col. Wakeman, Col. Tappan, Gen. Tallmadge, Messrs. H. Ketchum, C. Tracy, and F. Hotaling, Committee. Gen. J. A. Dix, Cols. A. Warner, and O. D. F. Grant. The following general order of the Home Guard was passed: Jno. Newhouse, Secretary. Home Guard, Palace Garden, April 26. General orders. The commandant promulgates the following order, for the organization of the corps: 1. The corps shall be known as the home Guard. 2. It shall be divided into companies of fifty men each, to be selected, as far as practicable, from the same vicinity. 3. To each company there shall be a captain, two lieutenants, and four sergeants. 4. The corps shall be armed as follows: The commandant, his staff and the captains, and lieutenants with swords the residue with muskets, with waist belts of black leather. 5.
s well as for the valuable aid which his large experience as a railroad man enabled him to render me in pushing through the trains conveying my troops from Chattanooga to Nashville, and from Murfreesboro to Decatur Captain Osborn, Twentieth Indiana battery, and Captain Ayleshire, Eighteenth Ohio battery, deserve praise for the effective and gallant manner in which they handled their respective batteries. I am pleased to mention Mr. Stevens, Superintendent of the N. and C. Railroad; Mr. Tallmadge, Master of Transportation at Chattanooga; and Mr. Bryant, Assistant Superintendent N. and C. Railroad, as most honorable exceptions, among the railroad men who have been censured by me for neglect of duty. These gentlemen did everything in their power to aid me in getting over the railroad with my command. I respectfully commend them for their efforts. I respectfully recommend Colonel William L. Palmer, Fifteenth Pennsylvania cavalry, for promotion, for distinguished, gallant and su
s well as for the valuable aid which his large experience as a railroad man enabled him to render me in pushing through the trains conveying my troops from Chattanooga to Nashville, and from Murfreesboro to Decatur Captain Osborn, Twentieth Indiana battery, and Captain Ayleshire, Eighteenth Ohio battery, deserve praise for the effective and gallant manner in which they handled their respective batteries. I am pleased to mention Mr. Stevens, Superintendent of the N. and C. Railroad; Mr. Tallmadge, Master of Transportation at Chattanooga; and Mr. Bryant, Assistant Superintendent N. and C. Railroad, as most honorable exceptions, among the railroad men who have been censured by me for neglect of duty. These gentlemen did everything in their power to aid me in getting over the railroad with my command. I respectfully commend them for their efforts. I respectfully recommend Colonel William L. Palmer, Fifteenth Pennsylvania cavalry, for promotion, for distinguished, gallant and su
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 23: three months in Congress. (search)
o Washington forty-three miles further than the Committee paid me; but I stated before the Committee the reasons why I made the change of route. I had been capsized once—— The Chairman interposed, and said he felt bound to arrest this debate. [Cries of Greeley! Greeley! ] Mr. Greeley rose—— The Chairman stated that it would not be in order for the gentleman to address the House while there was no question pending. [Cries of Suspend the rules; hear him. ] Mr. Tallmadge rose and inquired if his colleague could not proceed by general consent? The Chairman replied in the affirmative. No objection was made, and Mr. Greeley proceeded. The gentleman from Massachusetts [Mr. Hudson] simply misunderstood only one thing. He states me to have urged the considerations which he urged to me. He urged these considerations—and I think forcibly. I say now, as I did the other day on the floor of this House, I approve of the appropriation for the boo
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
must be done by new men, under new names; for the hold of the Republican party on the affections of the people was too strong to be easily loosened. The opportunity came when Missouri applied for admission in December, 1818. In the House, Mr. Tallmadge, of New York, offered an amendment, February 13, 1819,to the bill for Missouri's admission, imposing the restriction that all persons born in the State should be free, and providing for the gradual emancipation. After an exciting debate, in which Mr. Tallmadge pressed his amendment with signal eloquence and ability, it was adopted February 16th by a vote of 87 to 76, and the amended bill passed by vote of 97 to 56. (Benton's Abridgment, vol. 6, pp. 333, 356.) All party ties were discarded, and new bonds of sympathy were suddenly formed. The Free States were temporarily arrayed on one side and the Slave States on the other. The bill went to the Senate, where the slavery restriction was stricken out. The House refused to concur,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters and times of the Tylers. (search)
volved in a crisis of unprecedented severity; commerce and manufactures were prostrate. The President called an extra session to meet in September, 1837. This extra session witnessed, to quote the language of our writer, the debut in Van Buren's message of the new system of finance, Vol. I, page 584. It also witnessed, as he observes, a split in the ranks of the Democratic party. This faction called themselves conservatives, among which were some men of great virtue and ability— Rives, Tallmadge and Legree being of that party. But what is also remarkable Calhoun, Tazewell, Gordon, Troup and many others of the Whig party, who had been bitter opponents of the Jackson measures, co-operated with the Democrats on the specie platform of the sub-treasury. We will not trace out at this time the history of the sub-treasury. It was a scheme used as a substitute for a national bank, and its very existence depended upon and practiced daily all of the essential features of banking, except l
, not for ten thousand guineas. They then led him off, and, arriving in the evening at North Castle, they delivered him with his papers to Lieutenant Colonel Jameson, who commanded the post, and then went their way, not asking a reward for their services, nor leaving their names. What passed between Andre and Jameson is not known. The result of the interview was, that on the twenty-fourth the prisoner was ordered by Jameson 24. to be taken to Arnold; but on the sharp remonstrance of Major Tallmadge, the next in rank, the order was countermanded, and he was confined at Old Salem, yet with permission to inform Arnold by Chap. XVIII.} 1780. Sept. 25. letter of his arrest. His letter was received on the twenty-fifth, too late for an order to be given for his release, and only in time for Arnold himself to escape down the river to the Vulture. Washington, who had turned aside to examine the condition of the works at West Point, arrived a few hours after his flight. The first c
Confederates, who greatly praised his heroism. I have just brought his cap and spurs from the Zouave camp. Two Zouaves died prisoners, viz: Benjamin F. Hopper and Joseph S. Taylor, nephew of Moses Taylor. The Confederates represented that they had other prisoners whom they were willing to exchange. Captain Phillips has to day visited the Fortress with a flag of truce in reference to the same. There was an alarm last night. The whole garrison turned out. General Butler and Quartermaster Tallmadge have this evening gone to Newport News. Reconnoissances have been made from Fortress Monroe and Newport News. It is reported that Jefferson Davis was at Richmond last week. The weather continues hot. The thermometer stood yesterday at 92 in the shade. Account by a Zouavr who was there. One of the Zouaves from New York, who participated in the fight at Great Bethel, thus describes what he saw: The centre and right of the skirmishers kept moving on until
nnon struck the corner of the rebel magazine. It scattered the rebels like a bolt from heaven, and came near producing an explosion. The batteries have consequently been moved from their former position. The rebels are not safe within four miles of this terrible projectile. Many pieces of artillery in the fortress are being rifled. The Union gun is also being mounted. The Roads swam with shipping, and immense storehouses are in process of erection for Government supplies. Quartermaster Tallmadge will, in a few days, receive five hundred additional horses for the use of the army, and complete camp and garrison equipage for ten thousand men. The worthless garments of the New York volunteers will soon be exchanged for substantial United States uniforms. Several wharves and a short railroad are also being constructed, and altogether, Old Point presents a lively appearance. Last evening there was a very brilliant reception on board the Cumberland. There is another flag of
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