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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 28, 1865., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 20 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Roger B. Taney or search for Roger B. Taney in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

pe, for two centuries, has never beheld in any Government! No, sir! no, sir! There will be no secession. Gentlemen are not serious when they talk of secession. The Supreme Court, too, speaking through each of its great chiefs, Marshall and Taney, repels the doctrine. In the case of McCulloch and Maryland, the first of these, as the organ of the whole Court, rejected it in clear terms. The very foundation, the only one on which it can for a moment stand, is, that the Constitution is a adjudged was over and over again, under the administration of the same great judge, maintained as the settled judgment of the Court, and without a dissenting voice. It has, with equal clearness, uniformity, and force, been upheld since Chief Justice Taney became the presiding ornament of that high tribunal. It was involved in the case of the United States and Booth in 21st Howard. In that instance the State of Wisconsin, through its courts, resisted the authority of the United States, and
aval forces, is seized in his own house — not by process of law, but by the arbitrary grasp of military power-and, torn from the side of his family, is borne to Fort McHenry, over which it had been invoked by Key that the flag of the free forever should wave. The aid of the highest privilege which freedom has yet conferred upon the citizen of a free country, was sought to vindicate the rights of Mr. Merryman, and the Chief-Justice of the United States, the pure-hearted and high-minded Roger B. Taney, issued the writ of habeas corpus, requiring the prisoner to be brought before him. The result of his interference has already become historical. The officer of the law found the portals of the fortress barred against him. He was denied admission, and it was told that the officer in command had suspended the writ of habeas corpus. Mr. Vallandigham then entered into a history of the writ of habeas corpus, which had been extorted, after six hundred years of toil and suffering, from ven
e which pretends to the elements of civilization and liberty. George Washington carried the thirteen colonies through the war of the Revolution without martial law. The President of the United States could not conduct the Government three months without resorting to it. I presume every Senator has read the opinion of the Chief-Justice to which I have referred. I shall content myself with reading a few extracts, to present my opinions on the subject. [Mr. B. read from the closing part of Judge Taney's opinion.] Thus the President has assumed the legislative and judicial powers, and concentrated in his hands the executive, legislative, and judicial powers, which in every age have been the very evidence of despotism, and he exercises them to-day, while we sit in the Senate chamber, and the other branch of the Legislature at the other end of the capitol. Mr. President, what is the excuse — what is the justification,--necessity? I answer, first, that there was no necessity. Was it nece