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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 3 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), James, Edwin 1797-1861 (search)
James, Edwin 1797-1861 Geologist; born in Weybridge, Vt., Aug. 27, 1797; graduated at Middlebury College in 1816; and afterwards studied medicine, botany, and geology in Boston. He is the author of a Report of the expedition to the Rocky Mountains, 1818-19; Narrative of John Tanner, etc. He died in Burlington, Ia., Oct. 28, 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tanner, John 1780-1847 (search)
Tanner, John 1780-1847 Captive; born in Kentucky about 1780. His father laid out a farm at the mouth of the Big Miami River, O. When John was six years old he was captured by an Indian, and after two years detention was sold to Net-nokwa, an Ottawa Indian. He lived in captivity for thirty years, becoming so thoroughly accustomed to Indian life that he forgot his own language. He engaged in warlike expeditions and married Miskwa-bun-o-kwa ( the Red Sky of the Morning ). Subsequently he wea Indian. He lived in captivity for thirty years, becoming so thoroughly accustomed to Indian life that he forgot his own language. He engaged in warlike expeditions and married Miskwa-bun-o-kwa ( the Red Sky of the Morning ). Subsequently he went to Detroit, where he met his brother and visited his family. He was then employed as an interpreter. He was the author of a Narrative of the captivity and adventures of John Tanner during thirty years residence among the Indians. He died in 1847.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tyler, John 1790-1862 (search)
ry covered at present by pine forests of great value, and much of it capable hereafter of agricultural improvement, is not a matter upon which the opinion of intelligent men is likely to be divided. So far as New Hampshire is concerned, the treaty secures all that she requires, and New York and Vermont are quieted to the extent of their claim and occupation. The difference which would be made in the northern boundary of these two States by correcting the parallel of latitude may be seen on Tanner's maps (1836), new atlas, maps Nos. 6 and 9. From the intersection of the forty-fifth degree of north latitude with the St. Lawrence and along that river and the lakes to the water communication between Lake Huron and Lake Superior the line was definitely agreed on by the commissioners of the two governments under the sixth article of the treaty of Ghent; but between this last-mentioned point and the Lake of the Woods the commissioners, acting under the seventh article of that treaty, fou
Chapter 11: Seige of Charleston Upon returning to their several stations, the Fifty-fourth companies reassumed the old duties. The first noteworthy incident occurred on July 13, when, at noon, six shells passing over the Third Rhode Island Artillery camp, fell into ours, one of which, exploding in a tent, killed Private John Tanner and Musician Samuel Suffhay, both of Company B. We had supposed the location safe from any shell firing. These missiles came from Sullivan's Island, clear across the harbor. A lookout posted on the sand-bluff near by gave warning thereafter when this gun opened, which it did at intervals until the last of August. At such times, day or night, we were obliged to leave the camp for the sea beach. No further casualties occurred, however. Another example of dislike to colored troops took place on the 15th. Lieut. John S. Marcy, Fifty-second Pennsylvania, when directed to join the Fifty-fourth detail for duty at the Left Batteries, with some of his
Sumterville, S. C., 289, 294, 295, 296. Sunstrokes, 201, 205. Surrender of Lee, 308. Sutlers, 108, 115, 177, 215. Sutton, William, 32. Suwanee River, Fla., 155,157. Swails, Stephen A., 91, 135, 165, 169, 176, 179, 183, 193, 194, 202, 233, 268,291, 296, 298, 316, 817. Swamp Angel Battery, 108, 112, 114, 225. Swayne, Wager, 272. Swift Creek, S. C., 300, 301. Sylvia, Samuel, 302. T. Talbird's house, 261. Taliaferro, William B., 70, 71, 94, 95, 99, 203, 206, 208. Tanner, John, 217. Tatom, Battery, 203. Tatom, W. T., 88. Taylor, A., and Company, 10. Taylor, James H., 312. Taylor, Rev., Father, 15. Ten Eyck, Anthony, 184. Ten Mile Run, Fla., 153. Ten Mile Station, Fla., 174. Tennessee Troops. Cavalry: Lewis' Brigade, 301. Tenth Corps, 129, 185. Terry, Adrian, 117. Terry, Alfred H., 52, 53, 55, 61, 62, 63, 101, 106, 114, 122, 143, 146, 157, 185, 268. Thanksgiving Day, 139, 234. Thomas, C. F., steamer, 317. Thompson, Albert D., 315.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
rs, Maj. R. A. Wayne; Twenty-eighth battalion, four companies, Maj. A. Bonaud, and three companies, Capt. J. A. Cotten. In district of Georgia, Brig.-Gen. H. W. Mercer commanding—Second Confederate engineers, Company D, Capt. J. W. McAlpine; First Georgia, Col. C. H. Olmstead; Twenty-second battalion, Lieut.-Col. W. R. Pritchard; Twenty-ninth regiment, Company G; Thirteenth regiment, Company K; Fifty-fourth, four companies, Maj. George L. Buist; Fifty-seventh, Col. W. Barkaloo; Sixty-third, Col. George A. Gordon, Jackson guards, Capt. John Tanner; Fourth cavalry, Col. Duncan L. Clinch; Twentieth cavalry battalion, Lieut.-Col. J. M. Millen; Twenty-fourth cavalry battalion, Maj. E. C. Anderson, Jr.; Hardwick mounted rifles, Capt. J. L. McAllister; Joe Thompson artillery, Capt. C. R. Hanleiter; artillery company, Capt. N. B. Clinch; artillery company, Capt. John M. Guerard; Battery A, Capt. J. A. Maxwell; Battery B, Capt. Charles Daniell; Terrell artillery, Capt. John W. Brooks.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
upported, its fire was opened and this drew upon it so fierce an attack that the guns could not be drawn back to the main line of the division. But Brown's and Reynolds' brigades opened an effective fire upon the Federals, driving them back from the guns. General Hood was now under renewed orders to advance, and Stewart had actually assailed the Federal left, when the order was countermanded upon positive information that the Federals had crossed the Oostenaula to the westward, at Lay's or Tanner's ferry, and pushed back Martin's cavalry. Near this point Jackson's Georgia brigade made a fierce assault upon the greater part of Sweeney's division under Corse, and met a bloody repulse. The Confederate army crossed the river at midnight while the Federals were asleep, and the main body marched south of Calhoun while Hardee held back the advance of Thomas. On the 16th, while Thomas' main army confronted Johnston near Calhoun, McPherson was marching toward Rome, and Schofield and Hooke