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which the tall form of this soldier moved, and his sword flashed. That stalwart form had everywhere towered in the van. On the Rappahannock, the Rapidan, the Susquehanna, the Shenandoah, the Po, the North Anna, the James, the Rowanty, and Hatcher's Run — in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania-Hampton had fought with the stubborn courage inherited from his Revolutionary sires. Fighting lastly upon the the soil of his native State, he felt no doubt as Marion and Sumter did, when Rawdon and Tarleton came and were met sabre to sabre. In the hot conflicts o.f 1865, Hampton met the new enemy as those preux chevaliers with their great Virginia comrade, Light-horse Harry Lee, had met the old in 1781. But the record of those stubborn fights must be left to another time and to abler hands. I pass to a few traits of the individual. II. Of this eminent soldier, I will say that, seeing him often in many of those perilous straits which reveal hard fibre or its absence, I always rega
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The assault on Chickasaw bluffs. (search)
, assumed command, and divided the army into two army corps, one commanded by Major-General W. T. Sherman, and the other by Brigadier-General George W. Morgan. General Pemberton's report of the defense, on the 29th, is as follows: On the 29th, about 9 o'clock, the enemy was discovered in his attempt to throw a pontoon-bridge across the lake. In this he was foiled by a few well-directed shots from a section each of Wofford's and Ward's batteries, that of the latter commanded by Lieutenant Tarleton. About 10 o'clock a furious cannonade was opened on General Lee's lines. This ceased about 11 o'clock, when a whole brigade — about six thousand strong, understood to have been Brigadier-General [F. P.] Blair's, though not led by him in person — emerged from the woods in good order and moved gallantly forward under a heavy fire of our artillery. They advanced to within 150 yards of the pits when they broke and retreated, but soon rallied, and dividing their forces sent a portion
should desert the Rebel standard, full security to follow within these lines any occupation which he shall think proper. Lord Cornwallis, during his Southern campaign, proclaimed freedom to all slaves who would join him; and his subordinates — Tarleton especially — took away all who could be induced to accompany them. Jefferson, in a letter to Dr. Gordon, Dated Paris, July 16, 1788. estimates that this policy cost Virginia no less than 30,000 slaves in one year; most of them dying soon of small-pox and camp-fever. Thirty were carried off by Tarleton from Jefferson's own homestead; and Jefferson characteristically says: Letter to Gordon aforesaid. Had this been to give them freedom, he would have done right. The War of 1812 with Great Britain was much shorter than that of the Revolution, and was not, like that, a struggle for life or death. Yet, short as it was, negro soldiers — who, at the outset, would doubtless have been rejected — were in demand before its close. Ne
confederates had proceeded two thirds the way across the field; and a third confessed that McClellan had proclaimed it in a general order that all the United States soldiers who should fall into the hands of the rebels would be put to death! The house at Malvern Hill is a quaint old structure of the last century, built of red brick, and stands on a lofty hill a thousand yards from James River, of whose meanderings for several miles it commands a beautiful view. The house was standing in Tarleton's time, and is marked down upon the map accompanying the early English edition of his campaigns. A fine grove of ancient elms embowers the <*>awn in a grateful shade, affording numberless vistas of far-off wheat-fields and little gleaming brooks of water, with the dark blue fringe of the primitive pines on the horizon. It seemed a bitter satire on the wickedness of man, this peaceful, serene, harmonious aspect of nature, and I turned from the joyous and quiet landscape to the mutilated vi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General S. D. Lee's report of the battle of Chickasaw bayou. (search)
ed. He was exceedingly cautious. About 9 A. M. he attempted to throw a pontoon bridge over the lake to my left. This was soon thwarted by a few well directed shots from the section of Wofford's battery and a section of guns commanded by Lieutenant Tarleton, of Major Ward's artillery battalion. As soon as the attempt to pontoon the lake was discovered, my line of battle was pushed to the left by two regiments to throw them in front of the threatened point. The two regiments were the Forty-sion Major Holmes. Captain Wofford exhibited great gallantry and coolness, and to him is due more credit than to any one else for such defences as were at Chickasaw bayou, he having planned and executed most of them. Lieutenants Johnson, Duncan, Tarleton and Weims behaved well. Of my personal staff, I am pained to announce the death of Captain Paul Hamilton, Assistant Adjutant-General, who was killed on the 29th by the explosion of a caisson by a shell from the enemy, while executing an order.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of the artillery of the army of Western Louisiana, after the battle of Pleasant Hill. (search)
n of horse artillery; and Major Faries, Chief of Artillery of Polignac's division, commanding on the left, was ordered to place in position Cornay's and Barnes's light batteries, and Lieutenant Bennett, with his two thirty-pound Parrott's. Lieutenant Tarleton was in command of Cornay's battery. On the 16th, before sunrise, the engagement commenced, and soon swelled into the proportions of the most considerable artillery combat ever witnessed west of the Mississippi. Eighty pieces of artille Major Semmes with great deliberation withdrew his batteries en echelon from our right; and on the left, Lieutenant Bennett with his heavy Parrotts, was first withdrawn, followed by Barnes, who had exhausted all his long range ammunition; Lieutenant Tarleton, commanding Cornay's battery, was the last to retire, and from his Napoleon section poured a heavy fire into the enemy at 300 yards range. Notwithstanding the heavy fire of artillery and infantry playing on it, this superb and veteran bat
in his front, the banks of the stream being fortified in convenient places. I need not remind you of the battle of White Plains on the 28th October, 1776, where Alexander Hamilton distinguished himself as a captain of artillery, nor of the heights of Newcastle to which Washington repaired after the battle. At Bedford, where we hold our farms under Indian titles, bearing the mark of Katonah, sagamore, that were confirmed by patent of Queen Anne, some houses were burned in ‘79 by Lieut.-Colonel Tarleton heading a detachment of the Queen's Rangers, as related in his despatch to Sir Guy Carleton. At Poundridge and Hitching's corner occurred bloody skirmishes. Then, there are near by us Mile-square, where the Americans kept a strong guard; Pine's Bridge, which served as the principal communication between the hostile lines, and where Enoch Crosby, the Westchester spy — known to all readers of our great novelist as Harvey Birch, commenced his career of secret service; King's Bridge,
range, the founder of the Dutch Republic, the United States of Holland—I do not forget how he was publicly branded as a perjurer and a pest of society; and, not to dwell on general instances, how the enterprise for the abolition of the slave-trade was characterized on the floor of Parliament by one eminent speaker as mischievous, and by another as visionary and delusive; and how the exalted characters which it had enlisted were arraigned by still another eminent speaker—none other than that Tarleton, so conspicuous as the commander of the British horse in the southern campaigns of our Revolution, but more conspicuous in politics at home,—as a junto of sectaries, sophists, enthusiasts and fanatics; and also were again arraigned by no less person than a prince of the blood, the Duke of Clarence, afterwards William IV. of England, as either fanatics or hypocrites, in one of which classes he openly placed William Wilberforce. But impartial history, with immortal pen, has redressed these <
range, the founder of the Dutch Republic, the United States of Holland—I do not forget how he was publicly branded as a perjurer and a pest of society; and, not to dwell on general instances, how the enterprise for the abolition of the slave-trade was characterized on the floor of Parliament by one eminent speaker as mischievous, and by another as visionary and delusive; and how the exalted characters which it had enlisted were arraigned by still another eminent speaker—none other than that Tarleton, so conspicuous as the commander of the British horse in the southern campaigns of our Revolution, but more conspicuous in politics at home,—as a junto of sectaries, sophists, enthusiasts and fanatics; and also were again arraigned by no less person than a prince of the blood, the Duke of Clarence, afterwards William IV. of England, as either fanatics or hypocrites, in one of which classes he openly placed William Wilberforce. But impartial history, with immortal pen, has redressed these <
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
he has made his home for many years. John Peter Richardson, ex-governor of South Carolina, was born in Clarendon county, September as, 1829, son of John Peter Richardson, who represented South Carolina in Congress and was elected governor in 1840. The latter was the son of John Peter Richardson, son of Gen. Richard Richardson, a native of Virginia who removed to Clarendon county in colonial times, exerted great influence during the Revolution, and at eighty years of age was arrested by Tarleton, carried to Charleston on a horse behind a trooper and kept on a prison ship until his release gave him only the privilege of dying at his home. The eldest son of Gen. Richard Richardson was James Burchell Richardson, who was elected governor of South Carolina in 1804. Two other descendants of General Richardson have held the same high office, Gov. Richard I. Manning and Gov. John L. Manning, while many more have won distinction in the councils of the State and nation. The subject of this
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