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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 65 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blackstock's, battle at. (search)
lected a small force near Charlotte.. N. C., and with these returned to South Carolina. (See fishing Creek.) For many weeks he annoyed the British and Tories very much. Cornwallis. who called him the Carolina Gamecock, tried hard to catch him. Tarleton, Wemyss. and others were sent out for the purpose. On the night of Nov. 12 Major Wemyss, at the head of a British detachment, fell upon him near the Broad River, but was repulsed. Eight days afterwards he was encamped at Blackstock's plantatid River, but was repulsed. Eight days afterwards he was encamped at Blackstock's plantation, on the Tyger River, in Union District, where he was joined by some Georgians under Colonels Clarke and Twiggs. There he was attacked by Tarleton, when a severe battle ensued (Nov. 20). The British were repulsed with a loss in killed and wounded of about 300, while the Americans lost only three killed and five wounded. General Sumter was among the latter, and was detained from the field several mouths.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bryant, William Cullen, 1794-1878 (search)
ts head. In that poem he violently assailed President Jefferson. and revealed the intensity of the opposition to him and his policy in New England, which made even boys bitter politicians. Alluding to Jefferson's narrow escape from capture by Tarleton in 1781, his zeal for the French, and his scientific researches, young Bryant wrote: And thou, the scorn of every patriot name, Thy country's ruin, and her council's shame! Poor, servile thing! derision of the brave! Who erst from TarletoTarleton fled to Carter's cave ; Thou, who, when menaced by perfidious Gaul, Didst prostrate to her whisker'd minion fall; And when our cash his empty bags supplied, Did meanly strive the foul disgrace to hide. Go, wretch, resign the Presidential chair, Disclose thy secret measures, foul or fair; Go. search with curious eye for horned frogs 'Mid the wild wastes of Louisiana bogs, Or, where Ohio rolls his turbid stream, Dig for huge bones, thy glory and thy theme. He wrote the poem Thanatopsis wh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buford, Abraham, 1778-1833 (search)
hed Camden in safety, and was retreating leisurely towards Charlotte, when Colonel Tarleton, with 700 men, all mounted, sent in pursuit by Cornwallis, overtook Buford upon the Waxhaw Creek. Tarleton had marched 100 miles in fifty-four hours. With only his cavalry — the remainder were mounted infantry — he almost surrounded Bufordefused compliance. While flags for the conference were passing and repassing, Tarleton, contrary to the rules of warfare, was making preparations for an attack in caer. None was given, and men without arms were hewn to pieces by the sabres of Tarleton's cavalry. There were 113 slain; and 150 were so maimed as to be unable to trbaggage became spoil for the enemy. For this savage feat Cornwallis eulogized Tarleton, and commended him to the ministers as worthy of special favor. Afterwards, TTarleton's quarter became a proverbial synonym for cruelty. Stedman, one of Cornwallis's officers, and a historian of the war, wrote, On this occasion the virtue of h
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cathcart, William Schaw, Earl 1755-1843 (search)
Cathcart, William Schaw, Earl 1755-1843 Military officer; born in Petersham, England, Sept. 17, 1755; joined the British army in June, 1777, and came to the United States; later was aide to Gen. Spencer Wilson and General Clinton, and participated in the siege of Forts Montgomery and Clinton, and in the battles of Brandywine and Monmouth. In May, 1778, during the reception given in honor of Lord Howe, in Philadelphia, he led one section of the knights at the celebrated Mischianza (q. v.). Later he recruited and commanded the Caledonian Volunteers, which subsequently was called Tarleton's Legion. He returned to England in 1780, and was promoted lieutenant-general in 1801. He died in Cartside, Scotland, June 16, 1843.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Choisi, Claude Gabriel de 1741- (search)
Choisi, Claude Gabriel de 1741- Military officer; born in France; entered the French Army June 16, 1741; came to America in 1780; was given command of a brigade with which, in conjunction with Lauzun's cavalry, he defeated Tarleton Oct. 3, 1781. During the Reign of Terror in France, through his friendship for the King, he was imprisoned and, it is supposed, died there.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornwallis, Lord Charles 1738-1805 (search)
o Philadelphia and Greene to the camp of Washington. Lord Cornwallis was left in chief command of about 4,000 troops when, in the summer of 1780. Sir Henry Clinton departed for New York. The earl, for the purpose of rooting out all signs of rebellion, sought, by cruel acts, to completely subdue the people through fear. He issued proclamations and instructions which encouraged hostility towards every patriot; and under these instructions his agents and the Tories committed many crimes. Tarleton and his legion spread terror in many districts. A quartermaster of his command entered the house of Samuel Wyley, near Camden, and cut him in pieces with his sword, because he had served as a, volunteer in defence of Charleston. Because the Presbyterians generally supported the American cause, they were specially singled out for persecution. Huck, a captain of the British militia, burned the library and dwelling of a Presbyterian clergyman in the upper part of South Carolina; and also bu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cowpens, the (search)
purpose of interposing his force between Greene and Morgan. Against the latter he had detached Tarleton with about 1,000 light troops. Aware of Tarleton's approach, Morgan retired behind the PacoletTarleton's approach, Morgan retired behind the Pacolet, intending to defend the ford; but Tarleton crossed 6 miles above, when Morgan made a precipitate retreat. If he could cross the Broad River, he would be safe. On his right was a hilly district, whTarleton crossed 6 miles above, when Morgan made a precipitate retreat. If he could cross the Broad River, he would be safe. On his right was a hilly district, which might afford him protection; but, rather than be overtaken in his flight, he prepared to fight on the ground of his own selection. He chose for that purpose the place known as The Cowpens, about sharp-shooters acted as skirmishers on each flank. At eight o'clock on the morning of Jan. 17, Tarleton, with 1,100 troops, foot and horse, with two pieces of cannon, rushed upon the republicans withhat moment Washington's cavalry broke from their concealment, and made a successful charge upon Tarleton's horsemen. The British were completely routed, and were pursued about 20 miles. The Americans
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fishing Creek, action at. (search)
aptured forty-four wagons loaded with clothing and made a number of prisoners. On hearing of the defeat of Gates, Sumter continued his march up the Catawba River and encamped (Aug. 18) near the mouth of Fishing Creek. There he was surprised by Tarleton, and his troops were routed with great slaughter. More than fifty were killed and 300 were made prisoners. Tarleton recaptured the British prisoners and all the wagons and their contents. Sumter escaped, and in such haste that he rode into Chclothing and made a number of prisoners. On hearing of the defeat of Gates, Sumter continued his march up the Catawba River and encamped (Aug. 18) near the mouth of Fishing Creek. There he was surprised by Tarleton, and his troops were routed with great slaughter. More than fifty were killed and 300 were made prisoners. Tarleton recaptured the British prisoners and all the wagons and their contents. Sumter escaped, and in such haste that he rode into Charlotte, N. C., without hat or saddle.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hanging Rock, action at. (search)
Hanging Rock, action at. After his unsuccessful attack on Rocky Mount, Colonel Sumter crossed the Catawba, and fell upon a British post at Hanging Rock. 12 miles east of the river, Aug. 6, 1780, commanded by Major Carden. A large number of British and Tories were there. Among the former were the infantry of Tarleton's Legion. Sumter soon dispersed them, when his men scattered through the camp, seeking plunder and drinking the liquors found there. Intoxication followed. The British rallied, and attacked the disordered patriots, and a severe skirmish ensued. The British were reinforced, and Sumter was compelled to retreat: but the British had been so severely handled that they did not attempt to pursue. With a few prisoners and some booty, Sumter retreated towards the Waxhaw, bearing away many of his wounded men. The battle lasted about four hours. Sumter lost twelve killed and forty-one wounded. At the same time Marion was smiting the British and Tories with sudden and fie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Huger, Isaac -1797 (search)
Huger, Isaac -1797 Military officer; born on Limerick Plantation, S. C., March 19, 1742. He and his four brothers—Daniel, John, Francis, and Benjamin—were distinguished in the struggle for independence, the latter falling in the lines at Charleston, May 11, 1780. They were of Huguenot descent. Isaac was in the Cherokee expedition in 1760, and entered the patriot army of South Carolina as lieutenant-colonel in June, 1775. He rose to brigadier-general in January, 1779, for active and gallant services. In the attack on Savannah, in the fall of that year, he led the Georgia and South Carolina militia. His force was defeated and dispersed by Tarleton at Monk's Corner, S. C. He distinguished himself under Greene, especially at Guilford and Hobkirk's Hill (q. v.). He died in Charleston, S. C., Oct. 17, 1
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