Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Josiah Tatnall or search for Josiah Tatnall in all documents.

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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: the Port Royal expedition. (search)
under way, stood toward the enemy's vessels, commanded by Commodore Josiah Tatnall, formerly of the U. S. Navy, and opening fire, soon causedew, and the Isaac Smith to follow, and standing in, opened fire on Tatnall's steamers, and drove them within the headlands, coming themselves In giving these instructions the flag-officer stated that he knew Tatnall well; he was an officer of courage and plan, and that it was not arts, and the vital duty of the flanking column was to take care of Tatnall, and destroy his vessels if he attempted that movement. With thrange of the earthworks, when the enemy opened. The force of Commodore Tatnall lay just within an imaginary line connecting the two forts. sing those advancing and now within fair range of the earthworks. Tatnall's were what are known as river steamers, extremely vulnerable, boiaim and rapidity of fire of the enemy. As the columns advanced, Tatnall's steamers withdrew, but when the main column turned they again pu
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: strategic Reconnoissances. (search)
en they would return, they preferred doing so under the cover of the night. The gunboats passed on, and reaching the part of the river nearest to the highest land on Wilmington Island, their farther progress was at least temporarily prevented by a double row of heavy piles driven across the channel. They anchored and despatched boats from the different vessels to examine numerous creeks and the upper part of the river. At 5 P. M. five Confederate steamers, one bearing the flag of Commodore Tatnall, came to anchor at the upper end of St. Augustine's Creek. The telegraph wire was seen on the marsh between Savannah and Fort Pulaski, and was cut. General Wright and others made careful examination as to the advantage of a military occupation of Wilmington Island, to which General Sherman had directed his attention. At 11.15 A. M. of the following day (28th), five Confederate vessels attempted to pass down the Savannah River to Fort Pulaski, with scows in tow. A force of gunboats
. L, 30, 43, 45 Stevens Lieutenant-Commanding Thomas H., 21, 54, 61, 138 Stimers, Chief-Engineer Alban C., 109 et seq., 138 Stolesbury, Engineer, 213 Stringham, Commodore, 165, 169, 171 Strong, Commander J. H., 81 Stuyvesant, Report of, 143 Sumter, Fort, see Fort Sumter. Sumter, the, U. S. steamer, 7 Susquehanna, the, U. S. vessel, 7, 16, 20 et seq., 23, 27, 32, 166 et seq., 174, 224, 228 Swan, Paymaster, 212 T. Tacony, the, 218, 228, 239 Tatnall, Commodore, Josiah, 19; his defence of Fort Walker, 22 et seq., 47 Taylor, Captain, Wm. Rogers, 77, 81 Terry, General A. H., 129 et seq., 160, 228, 231 et seq., 236 et seq., 241 et seq. Thompson, Colonel, 171 Ticonderoga, the, 222, 228 Toombs, Engineer, 141 Torpedoes, sketch of, 140; success of, 148; facts about, 157 et seq. Toucey, Isaac, ex-Secretary of Navy, 3 Trapier, General, 52, 57 Tristam Shandy, the, 229 Trumpeter, the, U. S. transport, 205 Truxton, Commander,