Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Tatnall or search for Tatnall in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
teries, not having yet been abandoned, fired a few shots in reply, while the Virginia, which, since the wounding of the brave Buchanan, had been commanded by Commodore Tatnall, showed her formidable shell (carapace), and the expedition was countermanded. Two days more were consumed in waiting. Finally, on the morning of the 10th,of being surrounded by the debris of that fleet and perish? Or was it not better to reascend the James River, so as to keep the Federal navy away from Richmond? Tatnall adopted the latter course. In order to get over the sand-banks of the river more easily, he lightened the ship, in pursuance of his pilot's advice, by landing r hull, rising higher than the water-line and the iron covering, was no longer proof against Goldsborough's cannon-balls. The latter might arrive at any moment. Tatnall was perplexed; and without attempting to remedy the error of the previous day, he set fire to his ship. The James River was open. The Federal gunboats hastened
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the naval war. (search)
e stockades had abandoned them, but five Confederate gunboats soon appeared and opened fire upon the Union vessels from a long distance. This was the flotilla of Tatnall, who, seeing that the Federals were trying to invest Fort Pulaski, was hastening to provision it; the flotilla towed a large number of lighters laden with rations. In this manner their guns had complete command of the river; at low water the gun-boats gradually settled in the mud, and thus formed immovable citadels. Commodore Tatnall came to attack them in this difficult position on the 14th of February; but the Federals, supported by four batteries of field-artillery that had recently beroyed these works on the 24th of March. All the approaches to Savannah by water had been closed by means of stockades and the hulls of ships sunk in the river. Tatnall's gunboats were stationed above these obstacles, and since the 22d of February there had been no communication with the garrison of Pulaski, except by means of li