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the less conspicuous, but equally useful, services of Major Isaac Brinker and Major John Reid be passed over in silence. To the practical good sense and untiring and well directed energy of the former, as Chief Quartermaster of my division, I am greatly indebted for the accomplishment of the march to Helena and back to this point; while the latter, as Chief Commissary of Subsistence, has, in spite of many difficulties, continued to subsist the troops both regularly and well. Lieutenant-Colonel Clay Taylor, Chief of Artillery and acting Chief of Ordnance, discharged the onerous duties of both those offices with laborious fidelity and to my entire satisfaction. To my Chief Surgeon, Thomas D. Wooten, to Surgeon William M. McPheeters, and to Assistant Field Purveyor R. M. Slaughter, my constant thanks and commendation are due for the sedulous manner in which they have at all times devoted themselves to the sick and wounded, but never more humanely or more conspicuously than upon th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of the Elkhorn campaign. (search)
of the staff of his Trans-Mississippi district. In February we reached Jacksonport, Arkansas, on the White river, and soon after moved up to Pocahontas, in the northeastern part of Arkansas, and began to organize an expedition against Saint Louis. Van Dorn's plan was to carry Saint Louis by a coup de main, and then to throw his forces into Illinois and transfer the war into the enemy's country. We had been busily occupied in preparing for this operation, when, late in February, Colonel Clay Taylor arrived at headquarters with dispatches from General Price, then in Boston mountains in northwest Arkansas. General Price related that after his victory at Springfield, or Oakhill, he had been forced by the reinforced enemy to retreat through Missouri down into Arkansas; that General McCulloch, commanding the Texans, was near him in Boston mountain; that the enemy, under Generals Curtis and Siegel, were lying only two marches distant, not over 18,000 strong, and might be overcome by a
Prior to the battle of Pea Ridge the staff officers of Maj.-Gen. Sterling Price were: Thomas L. Snead, assistant adjutant-general; John Reid, commissary; James Harding, quartermaster; Robert C. Wood, aide-de-camp; R. M. Morrison, aide-de-camp; Clay Taylor, aide-de-camp; T. D. Wooten, medical director; M. M. Pallen, surgeon. Subsequently, and east of the Mississippi river, they were: L. A. Maclean, assistant adjutant-general; J. M. Loughborough, assistant adjutant-general; A. M. Clark, inspectocamp; T. D. Wooten, medical director; M. M. Pallen, surgeon. Subsequently, and east of the Mississippi river, they were: L. A. Maclean, assistant adjutant-general; J. M. Loughborough, assistant adjutant-general; A. M. Clark, inspector; Thomas H. Price, ordnance officer; Clay Taylor, chief of artillery; J. M. Brinker, quartermaster; E. C. Cabell, paymaster; T. D. Wooten, surgeon; William M. McPheeters, inspector; John Reid, commissary; R. C. Wood, aide-de-camp; R. M. Morri-son, aide-de-camp.
ned in Australia." We extract the following paragraph from his letter: At the time Jackson was being burnt by Grant, and Vicksburg was being invested, Col Clay Taylor, of General Price's staff, crossed the Mississippi river to Arkansas, witnessed the efforts making by the enemy to reinforce and feed. Grant's army, and saw thwork as a private and a gunner. Holmes's army was doing nothing — never was doing anything, but dying, running, and being captured, as at Arkansas Post. But Col Taylor's application was refused on the ground that the enemy would land and burn the country. (They did not burn Mississippi homes and plantations!) Gen. Price then went in person to second Col. Taylor's application. "I will go," said he, "and take my division with me; and let the enemy land if he dare; I'll whip him back into the river." But Holmes would not allow any thing of the kind to be attempted. The writer further states that Gen. Holmes had at one time 40,000 men, who were demoral
Price's army. --A letter from Colonel Clay Taylor, written at Camden, Arkansas, under date November 15th, states that General Price had returned from Missouri with thirty-three thousand effective men. He carried with him eight thousand.