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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 53 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 19 3 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
5th N. Y. (3 cos.), Maj. Walter L. Cassin; 50th N. Y., Col. William H. Pettes; U. S. Battn., Capt. George H. Mendell. First Army Corps, Major-General John F. Reynolds, of this Corps, was killed July 1, while in command of the left wing of the Army; General Doubleday commanded the Corps July 1, and General Newton, who was assigned to that command on the 1st, superseded him July 2. Major-General Abner Doubleday, Major-General John Newton. General Headquarters, 1st me. Cav., Co. L, Capt. Constantine Taylor. First division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Wadsworth :--First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Solomon Meredith, Col. William W. Robinson; 19th Ind., Col. Samuel J. Williams; 24th Mich., Col. Henry A. Morrow, Capt. Albert M. Edwards; 2d Wis., Col. Lucius Fairchild, Maj. John Mansfield, Capt. George H. Otis; 6th Wis., Lieut.-Col. Rufus R. Dawes; 7th Wis., Col. William W. Robinson, Maj. Mark Finnicum. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lysander Cutler; 7th Ind., Col. Ira G. Grover; 76th N. Y., Maj. Andrew J
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Fredericksburg, Va. (search)
; E and G, 1st U. S., Capt. Alanson M. Randol. cavalry Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William W. Averell.: 1st Mass., Col. Horace B. Sargent; 3d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Edward S. Jones; 4th Pa., Col. James K. Kerr; 5th U. S., Capt. James E. Harrison. Brigade loss: k, 1. Artillery: B and L, 2d U. S., Capt. James M. Robertson. left Grand division, Maj.-Gen. William B. Franklin. Escort: 6th Pa. Cav., Col. Richard H. Rush. First Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. John F. Reynolds. Escort: L, 1st Me. Cav., Capt. Constantine Taylor. Escort loss: w, 3. First division, Brig.-Gen. Abner Doubleday. First Brigade, Col. Walter Phelps, Jr.: 22d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. John McKie, Jr.; 24th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Samuel R. Beardsley; 30th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Morgan H. Chrysler; 84th N. Y. (14th Militia), Lieut.-Col. William H. de Bevoise; 2d U. S. Sharp-shooters, Maj. Homer R. Stoughton. Brigade loss: k, 3; w, 24; n, 3 == 30. Second Brigade, Col. James Gavin: 7th Ind., Lieut.-Col. John F. Cheek; 76th N. Y., Col. William P
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in the Chancellorsville campaign. (search)
t; 15th N. Y., Capt. Patrick Hart; 29th N. Y., Lieut. Gustav von Blucher; 30th N. Y., Capt. Adolph Voegelee; 32d N. Y., Lieut. George Gaston; K, 1st U. S., Lieut. Lorenzo Thomas, Jr.; C, 3d U. S., Lieut. Henry Meinell; G, 4th U. S., Lieut. Marcus P. Miller; K, 5th U. S., Lieut. David H. Kinzie; C, 32d Mass., Capt. Josiah C. Fuller. Train Guard, 1st N. J. (7 co's), Col. William Birney, Capt. Robert S. Johnston. First Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. John F. Reynolds. Escort: L, 1st Me. Cav., Capt. Constantine Taylor. First division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Wadsworth. First Brigade, Col. Walter Phelps, Jr.: 22d N. Y., Maj. Thomas J. Strong; 24th N. Y., Col. Samuel R. Beardsley; 30th N. Y., Col. Wm. M. Searing; 84th N. Y. (14th Militia), Col. Edward B. Fowler. Brigade loss: w, 37. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lysander Cutler: 7th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Ira G. Grover; 76th N. Y., Col. William P. Wainwright; 95th N. Y., Col. George H. Biddle; 147th N. Y., Col. John G. Butler; 56th Pa., Col. J. William Ho
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Lee's right wing at Gettysburg. (search)
of our other troops were ready to obey their orders to cooperate. As I was the only one prepared for battle, I contended against the Federal army throughout the contest with two divisions and some misguided brigades sent to cover my left. Colonel Taylor, of General Lee's staff, takes exception to the delay in the attack of Pickett on the last day under the impression that, had I attacked earlier and before Edward Johnson was driven from the Federal right, the latter might have held his grouns commanding our left under Johnson, and that he alone could order concert of action. On the 2d, notwithstanding his orders to move in concert with my attack at 4 P. M., Johnson did not go in till 8 at night, long after my battle was ended. Colonel Taylor thinks the forlorn-hope should have gone in sooner. The universal opinion now is that it should not have gone in at all; and, as already stated, that was the opinion General Lee expressed soon after the battle. Some of our North Carolina
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A reply to General Longstreet. (search)
mately succeed. (Lee's report.) Longstreet was directed to use his whole corps, and when he felt embarrassed by the Federal forces on or near the Round Tops he was given a division and a half from A. P. Hill's corps, with power to call for more. General Long says: The original intention of General Lee was that Pickett's attack should be supported by the divisions of McLaws and Hood, and General Longstreet was so ordered. ( Memoirs of Lee, p. 294. See also statements of Colonels Venable and Taylor, Four years with General Lee, p. 108.) Lee's efforts for a concerted attack were ineffectual. Pickett was overwhelmed not by troops in front but by those on his flanks, especially by those on his right flank, where Wilcox was sent forward too late to be of use, and where he was too weak to have effected much at best. Yet Longstreet did not use any part of Hood's and McLaws's divisions to support Pickett, or to make a diversion in his favor, or to occupy the troops on his flank which finall
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
h, U. S, Cav. Guards and Orderlies: Oneida (N. Y.) Cav., Capt. Daniel P. Mann. Artillery, See artillery brigades attached to army corps and the reserve. Brig.-Gen. Henry J. Hunt. U. S. Engineer Battalion, Capt. George H. Mendell. First Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. John F. Reynolds of this corps was killed July 1st, while in command of the left wing of the army. Maj.-Gen. Abner Doubleday, Maj.-Gen. John Newton. Staff loss: k, 1; w, 1 = 2. General Headquarters: L, 1st Me. Cav., Capt. Constantine Taylor. Loss: k, 1; w, 2 = 3. First division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Wadsworth. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Solomon Meredith, Col. William W. Robinson: 19th Ind., Col. Samuel J. Williams; 24th Mich., Col. Henry A. Morrow (w), Capt. Albert M. Edwards; 2d Wis., Col. Lucius Fairchild (w), Maj. John Mansfield (w), Capt. George H. Otis; 6th Wis., Lieut.-Col. Rufus R. Dawes; 7th Wis., Col. William W. Robinson, Maj. Mark Finnicum. Brigadeloss: k, 162; w, 724; m, 267 = 1153. Second Brigade, Brig.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
outh. Besides the main operations at Vicksburg and Port Hudson, the navy had been occupied from time to time in detached bodies at other points. A cut-off, at the mouth of the Arkansas, ingeniously made by Selfridge in April, had contributed materially to the facility of operations at that place. In May Lieutenant-Commander Wilson in the Mound City effectually destroyed a water-battery at Warrenton. In June an attack was made on Milliken's Bend by Confederate troops from Arkansas under Taylor, and the garrison was driven from their works to the levee. At this critical moment Ramsay, in the Choctaw, turned his guns on the successful assailants, and though Lieutenant-commander James M. Prichett. From a photograph. unable to see the enemy on account of the intervening bank, he hailed the troops on shore to ascertain their position; and so well placed were the hundred or more shell and shrapnel that he fired that the Confederates were soon in full retreat. Finally, on the 4th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Union left at Stone's River. (search)
pinion that my men would be very much discouraged to have to abandon the field after their good fight of the day, during which they had uniformly held their position. I spoke of the proposition as resembling the suggestion of General Wool to General Taylor at Buena Vista, when Taylor responded: My wounded are behind me, and I will never pass them alive. Rosecrans called McCook to accompany him on a ride, Brigadier-General John H. Morgan, C. S. A. From a photograph. directing us to remain uTaylor responded: My wounded are behind me, and I will never pass them alive. Rosecrans called McCook to accompany him on a ride, Brigadier-General John H. Morgan, C. S. A. From a photograph. directing us to remain until their return. McCook has since told me that the purpose of this ride was to find a position beyond Overall's Creek to which the army might retire. Upon approaching the creek Rosecrans, perceiving mounted men moving up and down with torches, said to McCook: They have got entirely in our rear and are forming a line of battle by torchlight. They returned then to where we were, and Rosecrans told us to go to our commands and prepare to fight or die. The explanation of the torches is that the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Longstreet at Knoxville. (search)
works on a hill near the Armstrong house, and interfered seriously with our freedom of motion. Our skirmishers having vainly tried to move them, and artillery ammunition being too scarce for much of a cannonade on a minor point, we got up two of Taylor's Napoleons, so they could not be seen, behind a house which stood about 250 yards from the enemy's line, and asked for two regiments of infantry to charge it as soon as we made an impression. All being ready, the guns were run out from behind the house and opened vigorously with solid shot, being helped also by Moody's 24-pounder howitzers with shrapnel, a short distance to the left. At the close range Taylor made the rails fly at every shot, and the enemy began to desert them rapidly and run back over the hill. Then the 2d and 3d South Carolina regiments of Kershaw's brigade rose from their cover and dashed at them. Sanders and his officers rallied their men gallantly and brought most of them back to the line, and poured a heavy f
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the war on the Rapidan. (search)
little farther on, at two miles and two-thirds from Fredericksburg, this ridge widens again, forming an open plateau which terminates above the city. The slopes of this plateau are known by the name of Marye's Hill at the south-east, and that of Taylor's Hill at the north-west. We have stated that the pass of United States Ford gave access to the forest called the Wilderness a little below the confluence of the Rappahannock and the Rapidan. Among the various fords which are to be met highers movement, but the battle lie had just fought, besides the material losses that had resulted from it, had greatly impaired the confidence of his troops. The position that Sedgwick sought to occupy near the river was difficult to defend; that of Taylor's Hill was much preferable. At all events, the commander of the Sixth corps cannot be blamed for having directed his line of retreat toward the bridges of Banks' Ford, for in doing so he conformed entirely to the spirit of Hooker's instructions.
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