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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 12: Gettysburg. (search)
duced forces, simply observed each other. From his camp near Orange Court House, August 23, 1863, General Lee wrote Mrs. Lee that he hears his son is doing well, is walking about, and has everything he wants except his liberty. You may see that a distinguished arrival at Washington is chronicled in the papers of that city-Miss Catherine Burke. She is reported to have given interesting accounts of the Lee family. (This was one of the colored servants from Arlington.) My camp is near Mr. Erasmus Taylor's house, who has been very kind in contributing to our comfort. His wife sends us every day buttermilk, loaf bread, ice, and such vegetables as she has. I can not get her to desist, though I have made two special visits to that effect. All the brides have come on a visit to the army-Mrs. Ewell, Mrs. Walker, Mrs. Heth, etc. General Meade's army is north of the Rappahannock, along the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. He is very quiet. And again, September 4, 1863: You see I am still h
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
asting, piquant, and so consoling that one is almost inclined to envy the comfort it gave him in his latter days. Colonel Taylor and members of the staff claim that General Lee ordered that the divisions of McLaws and Hood should be a part of thefford General Longstreet further assistance if required, and to avail himself of any success that might be gained. Colonel Taylor says,--As our extreme right was comparatively safe, being well posted, and not at all threatened, one of the divisionng. It had not recuperated, having suffered more than was reported on the first day. But to accept for the moment Colonel Taylor's premises, the two divisions referred to would have swelled the columns of assault to twenty-three thousand men. We different all would have been! You wished me to bear this language in mind as your correspondence might be lost. Erasmus Taylor. Orange County, Va. A contributor to Blackwood's Magazine reported,-- But Lee's inaction after Fredericksburg w
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 38: battle of the Wilderness. (search)
leged fact. I had the letters published as an advertisement for the officer who was claimed as my guide. No response came. I inquired of the members of the staff, First Corps; not one had seen or heard of such a person. The quartermaster, Colonel Taylor, who was ordered to secure a competent guide at the first moment of receipt of orders to march, reported of the matter thus: Meadow Farm, Orange Court-House, July 1, 1879. General James Longstreet: Dear General,-- Your favor of the 30th uide for you, which I did after some difficulty in the person of Mr. James Robinson, the then sheriff of the county. I saw no such person, nor can I think that any such was at any time at our quarters before we broke camp. Sincerely yours, Erasmus Taylor. These efforts to secure one witness in support of the allegation, or rather to prove a negation, were all that occurred to me at the time, and now I can think of but one more chance, which is for Fitzhugh Lee to offer a liberal reward.
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 39: again in front of Richmond. (search)
absent on leave, nursing his wounds Hears of the death of cavalry leader J. E. B. Stuart returns to Virginia assigned to command on the North side of James River affair on the Williamsburg road Lee's apprehension of Grant's march into Richmond closing scenes of the campaign of 1864 about the Confederate capital General Benjamin F. Butler's move against Fort Fisher remote effects on the situation in Virginia. From the Wilderness I was taken to the Meadow Farm home of my friend Erasmus Taylor, and carefully nursed by his charming wife until put on board of a train for Lynchburg and taken to my good kinswoman, Mrs. Caroline Garland, who had lost her only son and child, General Samuel Garland, killed two years before at South Mountain. From her hospitable home, when strong enough for a ride in the fresh air, I was taken to the home of a cherished friend, Colonel John D. Alexander, at Campbell Court-House. But a raiding party rode through the village early one morning, which s
Runaway --From the Spotswood Hotel, during last week, a negro Boy, called Billy He belongs to Mr. Erasmus Taylor, near Warrenton, Va., is of dark color; low and thick set; slow and surly in manner and movements. Any one returning him to the office of the Spotswood Hotel, will be suitably rewarded. oc 10--3t.
Runaway --From the Spotswood Hotel, during last week, a negro boy, called Billy He belongs to Mr. Erasmus Taylor, near Warrenton, Va.; is of dark color; low and thick set; slow and surly in manner and movements. Any one returning him to the office of the Spotswood Hotel, will be suitably rewarded. oc 10--3t
Gen. Taylor and volunteers. --Probably no military man in the late United States so well understood the character of the volunteer soldier as the late President Taylor, or "Old Rough and Ready," as he was familiarly known in the camp. His best friends will not claim for him that the Presidency was his proper shere; he did not claim it himself; he never sought that office, never desired it; and, we have very little doubt, preferred the grave which relieved him from it to its ephemeral honPresident Taylor, or "Old Rough and Ready," as he was familiarly known in the camp. His best friends will not claim for him that the Presidency was his proper shere; he did not claim it himself; he never sought that office, never desired it; and, we have very little doubt, preferred the grave which relieved him from it to its ephemeral honors, its perplexing cares, and painful responsibilities. But as an American soldier, no man, since the days of Andrew Jackson, has touched such deep springs of admiration and confidence in the American heart. A veteran officer of regulars, he was also a practical and prosperous Louisiana planter, who had mingled freely with the world outside the army, and who throughly understood human nature and the management of mankind. Probably no two officers in the American or any other service differed
Runaway --From the Spotswood Hotel, during last week, a negro boy, called Billy. He belongs to Mr. Erasmus Taylor, near Warrenton, Va; is of dark color; low and thick set; slow and surly in manner and movements. Any one returning him to the office of the Spotswood Hotel will be suitably rewarded. oc 10--3t
ost he leaves Richmond this day.--General Lovell graduated at West Point in the class of 1842, with Generals G. W. Smith, Van-Dorn, Longstreet, Hill, (of Big Bethel fame,) Anderson, (who led the assault lately on Santa Rosa Island,) and with such other distinguished men of our army as Lay and McLaws. In the same class graduated Rosencranz, Pope, Doubleday, Sykes, and S. Williams, of the Northern army. General Lovell served through the whole of the Mexican war, part of the time with General Taylor and part of it with General Scott. He was there distinguished as a most gallant and skillful artillery officer, on the staff of General Quitman, who won fame as Adj't General of the division. While in New York, where he held office under Street Commissioner Smith, as Deputy, at a salary of $3.500 a year, he founded the city artillery company, of which he was commander until the secession of South Carolina, when he resigned, giving his reasons in a letter strongly secessionist. He has
McRoss, was discharged, the plaintiff not appearing. Wm. H. Bennett, charged with being drunk and disorderly in the street was held to ball in the sum of $200 for his future good behavior. Priscilla Reed, slave of James Halsey, and Lucy Brown, slave of the same, were committed to jail for going at large. Wm. Isaacs, a man of color, with no papers, was ordered ten lashes and committed as a runaway. --He had on his person, when captured, a large knife. Emeline, slave of Erasmus Taylor, charged with stealing a number of articles, amounting in the aggregate to a felony, from Bill Scott, was discharged, there being no proof of the charge. Andrew Lydeer in the city with Louisiana papers, was discharged with instructions to leave. Jacob, slave of Robert J. Wilson, charged with going at large, was committed as a runaway. James Pearce was fined three dollars for being drunk and lying on the sidewalk. Wm. Gray, free, living in the city with Amelia papers,
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