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e of Ad. D. G. Farragut. Loyall Farragut, rev. of; with outline history. United Service Mag., vol. 3, p. 11. Tallapoosa, U. S. steamer, injured in storm between Halifax and Boston, Nov. 3-7, 1864. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 205. Taylor, Gen. Richard. Reminiscences of the civil war; Pensacola and Manassas. North American Rev., vol. 76, p. 77. — Stonewall Jackson and the valley campaign. North American Rev., vol. 126, p. 238. Teche, La. Expedition of Gen. N. P. Banks, with letter of thanks from Gov. Andrew. Boston Evening Journal, May 5, 1862, p. 4, col. 2. — Dies of wounds received during reconnoissance, Oct. 19, 1864. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 137. Western flotilla. 1861. Nov. 7. Belmont; Taylor and Lexington, gunboats, engaged batteries. Ad. Henry Walke. Century, vol. 29, p. 423. — 1862. Mississippi fleet, preparations; account of ships and armament. Boston Evening Journal, Jan. 1, 1862, p. 4, col. 3. — – Feb. Fort Henry take
The Daily Dispatch: June 25, 1863., [Electronic resource], The capture of the Maple Leaf by Confederate prisoners. (search)
apt J D Wolf, A C S, 14th Ark; Capt Jos. Long. Capt J Giesecke, Lt J Schlick, 4th Texas Cav; Perser E A McGowan, Diana; Lt. Jno Smith, Lt J Weish, Lt Z M Porter, Arizona Battalion; Lt Broyle, 7th Texas Cav; Lt H. Wilkinson, C S A, Miss; Lt J M Obley, Choctaw Battalion; Capt Pronett, Lt, Andrew, 1st Ala; Lt D Estis, 9th Tenn Cav; Capt D J Semmes, C S Artillery; Capt E A Scott, Lt D Kirkland, 9th Lt Cav; Capt D H Creath, Gen Bee's staff; Capt G W Holloway, 1st La Bat Inf; Capt G L Fusilier, Gen Taylor's staff; Capt J J Atkinson; Capt E Holmes, Lt Wm Nelson, Lt Sam Aliston, Lt Aug. Burgniens, Lt Wm H Rogers, Crescent La Vols; Lt Jos Hinsofi, Miles's Legion; Lt Chas Comfort, 11th La; Lt T W Brown, 9th La Bat Inf; Lt J Webre, 28th La; Lt Jules Durbiege, Diana; Lt Chas Roupel. C S A; Lt A O Morse, C S Artillery; Lt T D Melville, 18th La; Lt H Fiek, Queen of the West; Lt R Stark Jackson, Lt Geo W Stafford, 8th La Vols; Lt D Hughes, Miles's Legion; Lt W C Jeter, Lt E Carmonche, 4th Lt; Lt J
Gen Taylor's operations in Louisiana. Natchez July 2 --The Louisville. Democrat says the last official advices state that Gens Taylor, Morton, and Green surprised the Federal ford locations at Brashear City on the 27th of June, and captured 1,800 prisoners, including 33 officers, also, $3,000,000 worth of commissary, $1,500,000 of quartermaster's stores; $250,000 of ordnance, and $100,000 of medical stores; also, 23 garrison and regimental flag, 10,000 tents, 2 000 horses and mules, 7 000 negroes, 7,000 stand small arms, 16 siege guns, and a position as important as Port Hudson or Vicksburg. Other important movements by Gen. Taylor are progressing. A private letter from the Conner battery states that General Walker's forces, 12,000 strong, had left Delhi, en route for Lake Providence, which is garrisoned by Federal and negroes. They hung two officers commanding negroes before leaving Delelessing. Nothing from Port Hudson.
The Daily Dispatch: August 3, 1863., [Electronic resource], The situation in Mississippi--Grant gone back to Vicksburg. (search)
He is too cunning an old fox to follow this army up among the sterile hills of Scott, when he would be at the mercy of the climate, the drought, and the cavalry; his communication constantly in danger of being out off, and his supplies destroyed. But we must wait and see. Gen. Banks is said to have gone after Gen. Taylor, who is reported at Donalsonville, La., with six siege guns and a gallant little army, preparing to fight it out. Magruder is reported marching to Taylor's assistance. He is too cunning an old fox to follow this army up among the sterile hills of Scott, when he would be at the mercy of the climate, the drought, and the cavalry; his communication constantly in danger of being out off, and his supplies destroyed. But we must wait and see. Gen. Banks is said to have gone after Gen. Taylor, who is reported at Donalsonville, La., with six siege guns and a gallant little army, preparing to fight it out. Magruder is reported marching to Taylor's assistance.
The Daily Dispatch: August 3, 1863., [Electronic resource], From Gen. Lee's army — fight in Culpeper county. (search)
Surgeons Trigg, M W Standford D Carter, T B Lewis, A M Cown, D C, Redford, A C Raines; Rev T D Moore; Lieutenants Litzy, J W McMichael, J H Green, Mundy, Ph Price, A A Q M, W P Togg, J T Sinclair, J B Talbott, J P Webb, R W Fenswick, Robert Cunningham, K F Peddicord, M M Thomason, Tom Monlard, F Leathers, D Carr, T B Bridges; H T Rocks, J L Williamson, T B Haines, Newton, Wellington, Thos Palls, J D Morris, W B Ford, John Parks, B L Drake, J A Middleton, A B Chinn, J Oldham, J W Gordon, C M Taylor, J A Fox, D Tribble, W S Hickman, J S Hughes, Alfred Surber, T S Kemper, R A Webster. It appears that the raid of Morgan into Ohio and Indiana was a pre-arranged movement, and that he was not driven over the Ohio river at Brandenburg by Gen. Hobson. This idea appears feasible; for if Morgan had been afraid of Gen. Hobson catching him he would not have crossed the Ohio at all, but would have tried to elude our forces in Kentucky, as he had men with him who knew every road in the State.
Gen. Taylor's victory. The telegraph, as announced on Saturday morning, has again given Gen. Taylor a victory. The enemy's account of the engagement at Donaldsonville encourages the idea that Gen. Taylor a victory. The enemy's account of the engagement at Donaldsonville encourages the idea that the victory was on our side, or we might seriously doubt the intelligence from our telegraphic agents in that quarter, who have, in the last three months, sent us much startling news that needed confso true; for we are very much in need of Yankee prisoners at the present time! Supposing Gen. Taylor has gained an important victory over the distinguished commissary of Gen. Jackson, we hope tor pleasure by the people of the South. It is but just, while on the subject, to say that Gen. Taylor has achieved more than any other of our Generals in the Southwest the present year. He seemsl all the facts are known, a just opinion cannot be formed upon the subject. We hope that Gen Taylor's reported victory is not exaggerated by the telegraph, and that it is indeed the turning poin
Lieut. Gen. Wm. J. Hardee. --This distinguished soldier having succeeded, temporarily, to the command of the army of Tennessee, a brief biographical sketch of him may not be uninteresting to our readers: Gen. Hardee is a native of Appling, in the State of Georgia. He graduated at West Point in 1838; reared under Gen Taylor in Florida, as Lieutenant commanding the 2d Dragoons, and also under Gen Scott in Mexico, being present at all the great battles, he so distinguished himself for skill and gallantry that he was twice breveted. He was subsequently commissioned to visit Europe for the purpose of perfecting tactics, and we have the result in his well known work on the subject. He was next appointed commandant at West Point, and occupied that position when Fort Sumter surrendered in 1861. On the happening of this important event, he resigned from the United States service, returned to Georgia, and was placed next in command to Gen Twiggs. Shortly afterwards he was appoint
re of eating and drinking at the table where Gen Lee's crockery was used Gen Lee's headquarters tents are much liked by Gen Taylor, who, together with his staff, enjoys the protection which they afford from the sun and rains. Nim's battery wagons are used in the transportation department of Gen Taylor's headquarters. The Chicago Mercantile and Nim's batteries are very highly prized by the rebels, and they assert their determination never to permit them to be recaptured, but to inflict the greatest possible damage upon the Union forces by hurling shot and shell from these batteries. Gen Taylor opposed the selling or raising of cotton, and declares that the transactions in it "makes more rascals on both sides than everything else." The rebel officers at Gen Taylor's headquarters were very jubilant at the reported victories of Gen Lee over Gen Grant, in Virginia, and drank the health of Gen Robert E Lee in copious libations of commissary whiskey, captured with Gen A L. Lee's
Battle at Morganza, La --The Mississippian extra, of the 22d, learns from a young gentleman just from Port Gibson, that before he left that place the report had reached there that Gen Dick Taylor had a battle with the enemy under Gen Canby, in which our forces were completely victorious. The enemy's loss is stated at 1,500 killed and wounded, 3,000 prisoners, seventeen pieces of artillery, and vast numbers of small arms, and a large quantity of stores, and that when Gen Taylor was last heard from he had completely routed and driven the enemy over sixteen miles. Our loss is estimated at 600 killed and wounded.