hide Matching Documents

Your search returned 66 results in 27 document sections:

1 2 3
mos Hemphill, John T. White, Collector of Taxes. Eleazer Davis,Field Drivers. Willard Butters, Thos. Gillard, Pyam Cushing,Fence Viewers. Peter C. Hall, Nathan W. Wait, John T. White,Fish Committee. Amos Hemphill, Elbridge Teel, Henry H. Jacquith, Pound Keeper. John Sparrell,Surveyors of Lumber. Jas. O. Curtis, J. T. Foster, E. Stetson, J. Loring, S. Lapham, O. Joyce, J. Stetson, J. Taylor, P. Curtis, P. Cushing, E. Hayden, G. T. Goodwin, A. Hutchens, R. E. Ells, H. Taylor, C. S. Jacobs, B. R. Teel, E. Waterman, J. Sanborn, T. T. Fowler, J. Clapp, B. H. Samson, Expenses. The first book kept by the Treasurer is lost. From the second, which begins in 1729, and others of later date, the following items of expenses are taken. The modern modes of book-keeping were not known to our fathers. There were sometimes two or three rates made in a year, varying from £ 20 to £ 200. The money collected by the Constable was paid into the treasury; but the a
Grammar, High Street.Oakman Joyce, D. Lawrence, and James O. Curtis.Charles Caldwell & Wm. B. Thomas.7568.77. 1851.Brooks, Brooks Street.John B. Hatch and James M. Usher.George A. Caldwell.2542.98. 1851.Primary, Salem Street.Geo. T. Goodwin, Henry Taylor, and M. E. Knox.J. J. Beaty and I. H. Bradlee.3375.41. 1852.Everett, Salem Street.Robert L. Ells, Samuel Joyce, and Henry Taylor.James Pierce.7166.57. The town proceeded immediately to the building of a new schoolhouse, on the spot whereHenry Taylor.James Pierce.7166.57. The town proceeded immediately to the building of a new schoolhouse, on the spot where the Park-street house was burned. April 2, 1855, Messrs. Franklin Patch, Judah Loring, and Charles S. Jacobs were chosen a committee to produce a plan, publish proposals, and carry forward the work,--consulting with the school-committee. The report of this committee was accepted and adopted: the consequence will be, a plain, substantial schoolhouse, two stories high, and furnished with all the modern conveniences. Brooks schoolhouse, 1861. Town-Hall. The question concerning the r
s Becan. detachment First Regt. P. H. B., Md. Vols. Company B--Wounded--Privates Adam Best, G. A. Zahn, G. W. Pool. Missing--Sergeants G. E. Ramsberg, D. J. Zarlon, Corporal J. A. Wagner, Privates R. C. Balsell, James D. Keller, R. M. Mitchell, Thomas Smith, U. H. Yingling, Andrew Teakle. Company G--Captured--Corporal Henry Nafe, Privates Rufus P. Burner, G. G. Brane, Garded Luttman. Missing — James Irvin, G. W. Gatlen, George W. Goodwin, Ephraim Stonesifer, Hezekiah Shelling, Henry Taylor, James Young. Company C--Missing--Sergeant J. R. Poffenberger, Privates Martin Glass, Henry R. Haines, George W. Palmer. Company K--Wounded — James Fisher, William Harris, Frederick Lutz, John H. Weldy. Missing — Thomas Brown, Thomas P. Collins, Nicholas Serverns, Gotleib Siedel, G. Hamilton Smith. 149TH regiment Ohio National guard. The medical officer on duty with this regiment, including Dr. Burnison of the Eleventh Maryland, together with the killed and wounded fell into t<
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Third Regt., Potomac Home brigade, Md. Vols. (search)
s Becan. detachment First Regt. P. H. B., Md. Vols. Company B--Wounded--Privates Adam Best, G. A. Zahn, G. W. Pool. Missing--Sergeants G. E. Ramsberg, D. J. Zarlon, Corporal J. A. Wagner, Privates R. C. Balsell, James D. Keller, R. M. Mitchell, Thomas Smith, U. H. Yingling, Andrew Teakle. Company G--Captured--Corporal Henry Nafe, Privates Rufus P. Burner, G. G. Brane, Garded Luttman. Missing — James Irvin, G. W. Gatlen, George W. Goodwin, Ephraim Stonesifer, Hezekiah Shelling, Henry Taylor, James Young. Company C--Missing--Sergeant J. R. Poffenberger, Privates Martin Glass, Henry R. Haines, George W. Palmer. Company K--Wounded — James Fisher, William Harris, Frederick Lutz, John H. Weldy. Missing — Thomas Brown, Thomas P. Collins, Nicholas Serverns, Gotleib Siedel, G. Hamilton Smith. 149TH regiment Ohio National guard. The medical officer on duty with this regiment, including Dr. Burnison of the Eleventh Maryland, together with the killed and wounded fell into t<
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, Index. (search)
77, 178, 179, 1800 213. Stowell, Martin, 147, 148, 149, 151, 153, 156, 157, 191, 198, 215. Straub, Mr., 209. Straub, Miss, 209. Strauss, D. F., 10r. Stuart, Gilbert, 280. Sullivan, J. L., 263. Sumner, Charles, 53, 125, 146, 175, 196, 267. Suttle, C. F., 148. Swift, J. L., 151. Swinburne, A. C., 289. Swiveller, Dick, 30. Tacitus, C. C., 360. Tadema, Alma, 289. Talandier, M., 304, 305, 306, 309, 300. Taney, R. B., 238. Tappan, S. F., 204, 215. Taylor, Bayard, 0108, 293. Taylor, Henry, 29. Taylor, Tom, 312. Tennyson, Alfred, 67, 272, 287, 291, 292, 294, 295, 296, 314. Thackeray, W. M., 187, 313. Thaxter, Celia, 67. Thaxter, L. L., 66, 67, 76, 94. Thaxter, Roland, 67. Thaxter family, the, 75. Thayer and Eldridge, 230. Therese, Madame, 320. Thomas, C. G., 91. Thompson, William, 198. Thoreau, Miss, 170. Thoreau, H. D., 25, 53, 78, 91, 92, 114, 169, 170, 181, 279, 360. Ticknor, George, 12, 15, 49, 189. Ticknor, W. D., 176. Ticknor & Fields, 183. Tid
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Lydia Maria child. (search)
nge for depth. Doubtless a learned person would have performed the task far better, in many respects; but, on some accounts, my want of learning is an advantage. Thoughts do not range so freely, when the store-room of the brain is overloaded with furniture. And she gives at the end, with her usual frankness, a list of works consulted, all being in English, except seven, which are in French. It was a bold thing to base a history of religious ideas on such books as Enfield's Philosophy and Taylor's Plato. The trouble was not so much that the learning was second-hand,--for such is most learning,--as that the authorities were second-rate. The stream could hardly go higher than its source; and a book based on such very inadequate researches could hardly be accepted, even when tried by that very accommodating standard, American scholarship. Apart from this, the plan and spirit of the work deserve much praise. It is perhaps the best attempt in our language to bring together in a pop
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Fanny Fern-Mrs. Parton. (search)
she has rebukes that scathe like flame, and scorn that bites like frost. With a healthy reverence for all truly devout souls, all earnest, humble, practical Christians,--for all things essentially pure and venerable,--Fanny Fern has an almost fierce hatred of cant, of empty pomp and formalism, assuming the name of religion. She valiantly takes sides with God's poor against the most powerful and refined pharisaism. She would evidently rather sit down to worship with the old salts, in Father Taylor's Seaman's Chapel, than in the most gorgeously upholstered pew, under the most resplendent stained windows, in the highest high church on Fifth Avenue. Not that she is wanting in a poet's sensuous delight in bright colors, rich textures, beautiful, refined faces, grand music and noble church-architecture, but that in the lives of the poor, colorless, homely, ungraceful, almost blindly aspiring and devout, there is something that moves her heart more tenderly and yet more solemnly. In th
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Margaret Fuller Ossoli. (search)
The rush, the flow, the delicacy of vibration in Shelley's verse can only be paralleled by the waterfall, the rivulet, the notes of the bird and of the insect world. It is as yet impossible to estimate duly the effect which the balm of his [Wordsworth's] meditations has had in allaying the fever of the public heart, as exhibited in Byron and Shelley. This is a rare series of condensed criticisms, on authors about whom so much has been written, and her remarks on the new men — Sterling, Henry Taylor, and Browning — were almost as good. She was one of the first in America to recognize the genius of Browning, and, while his Bells and pomegranates was yet in course of publication, she placed him at the head of contemporary English poets. There is much beside, in these rich volumes; a brief criticism on Hamlet, for instance, in one of the dialogues, which is worthy to take rank with those of Mrs. Jameson; and an essay on Sir James MacKINTOSHintosh, which, in calm completeness and tho
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
r known as historian than as poet. In 1849 he became Dean of St. Paul's. Sumner, when visiting England in 1857, renewed his acquaintance with the Dean. there was Taylor, Henry Taylor, born about 1800; author of The Statesman, and other works in poetry and prose. He has been for some years one of the senior clerks of the colonHenry Taylor, born about 1800; author of The Statesman, and other works in poetry and prose. He has been for some years one of the senior clerks of the colonial office. He married, in 1839, a daughter of Lord Monteagle (Thomas Spring Rice). the author of Philip Van Artevelde, Babbage, Senior, Lord Lansdowne, Mrs. Lister, Mrs. Lister (Maria Theresa), a sister of Lord Clarendon, was first married to Thomas Henry Lister, who died in 1842. She married, in 1844, Sir George Cornewall L time is hurried and my paper is exhausted, but I have not told you of the poet Milman, and the beautiful party I met at his house,—Lord Lansdowne, Van Artevelde Taylor, Babbage, Senior, Mrs. Villiers, and Mrs. Lister, who talked of Mrs. Newton 1 Ante, p. 186. with the most affectionate regard; nor of the grand fete at Lansdow
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
inet, which they, foolishly I think, are unwilling to grant: there are reports that at Easter this arrangement will be brought about. It was nearly one o'clock at night when we separated. I have several times seen in society your correspondent, Taylor, Henry Taylor. but without becoming acquainted. At Lady Davy's we were introduced. I at once told him that I had a near friend who had received a letter from him. He had received your letter, and wished me to say to you that he should be mosHenry Taylor. but without becoming acquainted. At Lady Davy's we were introduced. I at once told him that I had a near friend who had received a letter from him. He had received your letter, and wished me to say to you that he should be most happy to see you if you should ever visit England. March 1, 1839. Since my last date, I have dined with Lord Brougham. We had Lord Lyndhurst, Lord Stuart De Rothesay, 1779-1845; grandson of the third Earl of Bute, and at one time English ambassador at Paris. Lord Denman, and Charles Phillips —of Irish eloquence. I should not forget Lady Brougham,—a large-featured, rather coarse-looking woman,—who of course presided at her own table. In the drawing-room, before we went down to din<
1 2 3