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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Murray Taylor or search for Murray Taylor in all documents.

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olunteer A. D. C., (wounded severely at Cold Harbor;) Captain Adams, signal officer, serving on my personal staff; my Aids-de-camp, Lieutenants F. T. Hill, and Murray Taylor, and Captain Douglass, my chief engineer officer — were all gallant and zealous in the discharge of their duties. Surgeon Watson, Medical Director, made efficde-camp, were much exposed, and were ever prompt and active. Major Pierson, Chief of Artillery, was always on horseback, by the side of the battery engaged. Captain Taylor, Inspector-General, rendered valuable and important service. The ordnance officers, Captain West and Lieutenant T. J. Moore, attended faithfully to their dut Cobb, on the left, from whose command I detached a regiment, and halted it near the railroad bridge. Whilst with General Cobb, an Aid-de-camp of General Lee, Major Taylor, came up and informed me that General Jackson had orders to cooperate with me, and that there was some mistake about the orders directing him elsewhere. He de
my orders under a fire frequently uncomfortably hot; Major R. C. Morgan, Assistant Adjutant-General; Major Wingate, Captain R. H. Adams, Signal Officers; Lieutenant Murray Taylor, Aidde-camp, and Lieutenant Camfield, of my escort. My loss during this series of battles was, three hundred and forty-eight killed, two thousand two ith horses, harness, all complete, and immense stores of all kinds. General Jackson, and part of his command, came up at noon (twelve M.) of that day, and fought Taylor's (Federal) brigade coming from the direction of Union Mills, in which fight General Taylor (Federal) was mortally wounded. In the mean time, General Ewell was aGeneral Taylor (Federal) was mortally wounded. In the mean time, General Ewell was attacked at Bristoe Station, and toward night retired upon Manassas, Colonel Rosser protecting his (Ewell's) right flank, and bringing up his rear to Manassas, with his cavalry regiment. The cavalry was picketing and scouting in every direction that day and night. General Fitzhugh Lee was sent that day with a portion of his comma