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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 4: the Confederates hovering around Washington. (search)
e. All of the available wagons of the army were sent to gather and bring it in, and Colonel Stuart, with one hundred and fifty of his cavalry, the Sumter Flying Artillery (Captain A. S. Cutts), and four regiments of infantry detailed from different brigades, was charged with the command of the foraging party. The infantry regiments were the Eleventh Virginia, Colonel Samuel Garland; Tenth Alabama, Colonel Forney; Sixth South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Secrest; and First Kentucky, Colonel Thomas Taylor; the cavalry, Ransom's and Bradford's. General McCall, commanding the nearest Union division, happened just then to want those supplies, or, as seems more probable, had information through a spy of Stuart's expedition. He took measures to gather the supplies, or surprise and perhaps capture or destroy Stuart's party. However that may be, when Stuart reached the vicinity of Dranesville he found himself in the presence of General Ord, who had under him his own brigade of five
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
hael McCormick, Timothy O'Donohue, George Butts, Charles Asten, John Ortega. Maurice Wagg, R. H. King,----Wilkes,----Demming, Bernard Harley, William Smith, Richard Hamilton, Edward J. Houghton, Oliver O'Brien, Frank Lucas, William Garvin, Charles J. Bibber, John Neil, Robert Montgomery, James Roberts, Charles Hawking, Dennis Conlan, James Sullivan, William Hinnegan, Charles Rice, John Cooper, Patrick Mullin, James Saunders, James Horton, James Rountry, John H. Ferrell, John Ditzenbach, Thomas Taylor, Patrick Mullin, Aaron Anderson or Sanderson (colored), Charles H. Smith, Hugh Logan, Lewis A. Horton, George Moore, Luke M. Griswold, John Jones, George Pyne, Thomas Smith, Charles Reed, John S. Lann, George Schutt, John Mack, John H. Nibbe, Othniel Tripp, John Griffiths, Edward Swatton, John Swatson, Phillip Bazaar, George Province, Augustus Williams, Auzella Savage, John Jackson, Robert M. Blair, Anthony Williams, James W. Verney, Asa Bettram, John P. Ericson, Clement Dees, George W.
extended so far as shall be requisite to secure the abandonment of a practice unknown to the warfare of civilized man, and so barbarous as to disgrace the nation which shall be guilty of inaugurating it. With this view, and because it may not have reached you, I now renew the proposition made to the commander of the blockading squadron, to exchange for the prisoners taken on the Savannah an equal number of these now held by us according to rank. This communication was taken by Colonel Thomas Taylor, who was permitted to visit Washington, but was refused an audience with President Lincoln. He was obliged to content himself with a verbal reply from General Winfield Scott that the communication had been delivered to President Lincoln, and that he would reply in writing as soon as possible. No answer ever came. We were compelled to select by lot from among the prisoners in our hands a number to whom we proposed to mete out the same fate which might await the crew of the Savannah
ed and patented in England by Mr. Gaine. Figuer and Pomarede made attempts in the same direction in France, 1846. Karchiski, in 1860, subsequently treated the paper with glycerine, to give it suppleness. Stuart Gwynne made fractional currency of it about 1865 or 1866. To avoid the imperfect penetration of the acid, J. J. Ott treated a number of thin sheets with the acidulous solution, and combined them into a homogeneous sheet. A. T. Schmidt added the glycerine to the acid. Thomas Taylor (England, 1869; United States, 1871) treated the paper with chloride of zinc. See, — Hudson, March 16, 1869.Schmidt, April 4, 1871. Hudson, September 27, 1870, two patents.Hanna, October 31, 1871. Sheldon, January 25, 1870. Parclose. (Nautical.) The limber-hole. Pa-renthe-sis. A mark consisting of two curved lines face to face (). They inclose matter which is cognate to the subject, but which may be omitted without impairing the grammatical construction or the sub
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers, and soldiers who died as prisoners. (search)
onville, Ga.,June 19, 1864. Tannatt, James S., Sergt.,12th Mass. Inf.,Manassas, Va.,July 13, 1862. Tarbox, Thomas,*16th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Oct. 19, 1864. Taunt, Loring,19th Mass. Inf.,Confederate Prison,May--, 1865. Taylor, Archibald,2d Mass. Cav.,Savannah, Ga.,Sept.--, 1864. Taylor, Brainard E.,27th Mass. Inf.,Danville, Va.,April 17, 1865. Taylor, Elbridge G.,2d Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,Aug. 18, 1862. Taylor, Nathaniel,37th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 15, 1864. Taylor, Thomas,2d Mass. Cav.,Andersonville, Ga.,June 26, 1864. Taylor, William J.,34th Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,Dec. 1, 1864. Taylor, William K.,23d Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,May 25, 1864. Tedford, Milford,1st Mass. H. A.,Andersonville, Ga.,Feb. 25, 1864. Tenny, W.,*4th Mass. Cav.,Lost on Transport,--- Tesbe, John,*20th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,--- Tent (or Tent), Frederic,20th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Nov. 25, 1864. Thaxter, Benjamin,2d Mass. Cav.,Annapolis, Md.,Jan. 15, 1865. Thayer,
onville, Ga.,June 19, 1864. Tannatt, James S., Sergt.,12th Mass. Inf.,Manassas, Va.,July 13, 1862. Tarbox, Thomas,*16th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Oct. 19, 1864. Taunt, Loring,19th Mass. Inf.,Confederate Prison,May--, 1865. Taylor, Archibald,2d Mass. Cav.,Savannah, Ga.,Sept.--, 1864. Taylor, Brainard E.,27th Mass. Inf.,Danville, Va.,April 17, 1865. Taylor, Elbridge G.,2d Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,Aug. 18, 1862. Taylor, Nathaniel,37th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 15, 1864. Taylor, Thomas,2d Mass. Cav.,Andersonville, Ga.,June 26, 1864. Taylor, William J.,34th Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,Dec. 1, 1864. Taylor, William K.,23d Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,May 25, 1864. Tedford, Milford,1st Mass. H. A.,Andersonville, Ga.,Feb. 25, 1864. Tenny, W.,*4th Mass. Cav.,Lost on Transport,--- Tesbe, John,*20th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,--- Tent (or Tent), Frederic,20th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Nov. 25, 1864. Thaxter, Benjamin,2d Mass. Cav.,Annapolis, Md.,Jan. 15, 1865. Thayer,
nf., 424 Taylor, Charles, 424 Taylor, D. A., 32d Mass. Inf., 424 Taylor, D. A., 3d N. Y. Art., 49 Taylor, Dexter, 483 Taylor, E. A., 424 Taylor, Edwin G., 424 Taylor, Elbridge G., 554 Taylor, Frederick, 424 Taylor, G. C., 424 Taylor, G. W., 4th Mass. Batt., 183 Taylor, G. W., 27th Mass. Inf., 563 Taylor, G. W., 55th Mass. Inf., 424 Taylor, Giles, 495 Taylor, J. G., 483 Taylor, J. K., 483 Taylor, Nathaniel, 554 Taylor, O. S., 483 Taylor, S. C., 483 Taylor, Stephen, 483 Taylor, Thomas, 554 Taylor, W. J., 554 Taylor, W. K., 554 Teate, W. J., 483 Tebbetts, A. W., 152 Tedford, Milford, 554 Teeling, James, 483 Teherney, John, 424 Telburn, Emil, 424 Temple, H. D., 424 Templeman, J. W., 483 Tenny, W., 554 Tepper, Edward, 483 Terhune, William, 483 Terrill, C. F., 483 Terry, A. A., 483 Terry, A. H., 45, 84, 131 Terry, C. W., 483 Terry, G. W., 424 Terry, J. D., 47 Terry, T. W., 193 Tesbe, John, 554 Teut (or Tent), Frederic, 554, 556 Tewksbury, C. D.,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
he same family as that of the mother of President James Madison, and that of President Zachary Taylor, and a son of Col. Thomas Taylor, a native of Amelia county, Va., who in his youth moved to South Carolina, and later held the rank of colonel in thon of Benjamin F. Taylor, a native of Columbia, a planter and a representative in the legislature, whose father was Col. Thomas Taylor, born in Caroline county, Va., in 1751, who held the rank of colonel in the Continental army, and after the close of the Revolutionary war returned to his residence in Columbia, S. C. Dr. Taylor was graduated at the South Carolina college in 1855, and then entering upon the study of his profession was graduated at the South Carolina medical college in 1858. He pg General Hampton to the Carolinas he was at the battles of Averasboro and Bentonville. Since the close of hostilities Dr. Taylor has continued in the practice of his profession at Columbia. He has been honored by the positions of president of the
enant-colonels were John S. Garvin, William H. Hunt and William C. Reeder; the majors, R. D. Redden and David F. Bryan. Lieutenant-Colonel Garvin was wounded at Chancellorsville and Franklin. Capt. Sidney B. Smith was wounded seven times. Capt. Thos. Taylor and Lieut. R. K. Wood were killed at Chancellorsville; Lieuts. John Fowler and W. L. Branyon were killed at Gettysburg. Extracts from official war Records. Vol. Vii—(137) Alabama battalion, Major Garvin, a detachment of the Twenty-sllorsville, May 4, 1863. (939-950) In General Rodes' report he praises the regiment in high terms: In this charge the gallant Lieut.-Col. John S. Garvin fell desperately wounded, inside the works. Casualty returns, 12 killed, 77 wounded. Capt. Thomas Taylor and Lieut. R. K. Wood killed. (950-953) Col. Edward A. O'Neal's report of operations of Rodes' brigade from April 29th to May 6th. (954,955) Col. J. M. Hall's report of battle of Chancellorsville says: Justice demands that I should menti
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XXVI (search)
who were studious at once pinched ourselves to buy books; but the authors for whom we madeeconomies in our wardrobe are now as obsolete, very likely, as the garments that we exchanged for them. No undergraduate would now take off my hands at half price, probably, the sets of Landor's Imaginary Conversations and Coleridge's Literary Remains, which it once seemed worth a month of threadbare elbows to possess. I lately called the attention of a young philologist to a tolerably full set of Thomas Taylor's translations, and found chat he had never heard of even the name of that servant of obscure learning. In college we studied Cousin and Jouffroy, and he who remembers the rise and fall of all that ambitious school of French eclectics can hardly be sure of the permanence of Herbert Spencer, the first man since their day who has undertaken to explain the whole universe of being. How we used to read Hazlitt, whose very name is so forgotten that an accomplished author has lately duplicat
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